Distinctions in Glass

Distinctions in Glass | Bremers, Janecký, Shimomoto

 

Distinction can be defined both as a contrast between similar things, and an excellence that sets one thing apart from another. Two discrete meanings for the same word, yet both meanings apply easily to the glass work of the three artists—Peter Bremers, Harue Shimomoto, and Martin Janecký—featured in this exhibition. This gathering of three unique artists highlights the diversity of technique, form, and aesthetic which glass allows the maker. Bremers creates monumental cast glass sculptures—abstract, monochrome references to landscape and space. Shimomoto weaves glass threads into sculptural tapestries, employing clean lines to capture the essence of nature. Janecký is a modern-day Augustus Saint-Gaudens who sculpts molten glass into naturalistic, emotive busts and figures. Their commonality—a gift for manipulating this malleable material into astonishing works of art that elevate the viewer beyond the banal of the everyday.

Peter Bremers was an established light sculptor when he stumbled upon a glassblowing workshop in his native Netherlands, inspiring a journey of discovery in using glass to capture and bend light. The artist sculpts a model out of a dense foam block. By using the kiln cast method, the model is transformed into glass. He is well known for his awesome glass icebergs, inspired by a voyage to Antarctica in 2001, which bridge the psychic gap between humans and the natural world. He masterfully captures nature’s magnificence in flawless glass microcosms, bringing us intimately in tune with nature by kindling our sense of wonder and smallness around her majesty.

cast glass, 25 x 16 x 5.8"
cast glass, 26 x 5.2 x 6"
cast glass, 17 x 12.5 x 5.8"
cast glass, 19 x 25.8 x 3.2"
cast glass, 19.8 x 11.8 x 5.2
cast glass, 15 x 16.7 x 5.6"
cast glass, 17.5 x 12 x 6"

 

 

 

Bremers work in this exhibition turns the journey inward with metaphysical cogitations on space that offer a healing salve in a disconnected and anxious world. Bremers takes the interplay of positive and negative space—an element inherent in our physical experience of three-dimensional sculpture—and extends it in a metaphoric direction. He brings negative space into the sculpture in the form of holes and hollow sections; visible through an outer transparent shell of glass, their volume constantly shifts as the light flows through. These studies of space are monochromatic meditations on form and light—at times intricately faceted, gracefully arched, softly geometric, languidly amorphous. Eloquent descriptors such as Circumscribed, Honey Sweet, Illusional, Optical, Sensuous, and Connected title these “spaces,” signposts that encourage our understanding of Bremer’s artistic intention. Of this series, the artist has written, “Finding ourselves in a time of increasingly negative perception of everyday news events and an overall rising feeling of being unsafe in a world of religious, political, and social divisiveness, we may forget to focus on the possibilities and comfort offered by positive action and attitude. Positive space symbolizes tolerance, appreciation, hope, and opportunity.”

 

While Bremers articulates the grand physical phenomena of nature, artist Harue Shimomoto relishes in its small gestures and broad strokes. Diaphanous curtains of glass express abstract notions—weather shifting with the seasons, light morphing throughout the day, leaves changing their hue, air circling a pond, fields blowing in the wind. Simple colors and forms mingle in a complex but soothing mesh of layered glass rods. Illusionistic depth emerges as Shimomoto deftly wields positive and negative sculptural space and carefully handles light and shadow, distilling moments into shimmering immersive impressions. Like with Bremers, Shimomoto’s work goes beyond mere physical exploration, becoming a meditative journey that holds tightly to the impermanence of fragile moments and shifts the viewer’s gaze beyond the tangible.

fused glass, stainless steel wire, pigment, epoxy, metal hooks, 51 x 37 x 7"
(Sun Spring Light) fused glass, stainless steel wire, pigment, epoxy, metal hooks, 36 x 36 x 7"
(Freezing Night) Fused glass, stainless steel wire, pigment, epoxy, silver leaf, metal hooks, 36 x 36 x 7"

 

 

 

 

Shimomoto was born in Japan and received her BFA from Tokyo’s Musashino Art University, then came to the United States to get her MFA, settling afterwards in Rhode Island. Simplicity and ephemerality have a storied tradition in the Japanese aesthetic, a way of being that Shimomoto embodies, but also one from which she diverges. There is a quiet strength to her work—in its construction but more so it in its message—that makes her a unique amalgam. She has said: “I do not want the viewer to be too conscious of the glass. I almost believe that glass itself is too beautiful to be a medium. Many people see glass as functional object or decorative material. I want to break these images of glass and give it a different quality. Therefore, I am careful to make my work stronger than my medium.”

Sculpted glass 15.75 x 12 x 11.75"
alternate view approx. 27.5" h on stand
Sculpted glass 13 x 12.5 x 9.5"
alternate view

 

 

 

 

Martin Janecký is a master handler of the medium of glass, coaxing impossibly naturalistic figures and animals out of the material. Janecký was born to be a glassmaker, working in his father’s glass factory in the Czech Republic beginning at the age of 13. He likes to say “I didn’t pick glass, glass picked me.” After graduating from the glass school Nový Bor, he embarked on a path that has taken him to glass programs all over the world as a visiting artist and instructor to over 600 students a year. Teaching has been accompanied by endless learning, the time to formulate and hone his personal aesthetic, and the opportunity to push and perfect his innovative glass molding technique.

 

By “sculpting inside the bubble,” (blowing the basic bubble, then opening a hole and molding it with different tools from both the inside and the outside), Janecký achieves extraordinary realism and startling detail in his faces. Nooks, crevices, lines, and protuberances gradually emerge, a map of human emotion drawn in glass, radiating from within as is from a living, feeling soul. When asked about the meaning of his work, he has said: “I make things which fascinate me—not just from the workmanship point of view—I try to give them an expression. I don’t want to make just a realistic portrait. I want to capture feelings and emotions.” The external calm of the artist as he deliberately and slowly works the material belies his own creative mind—active, passionate, always seeking challenge.

 

A distinctive characteristic of glass as a medium is that it responds to challenge, yields to the vision of the passionate artist and skilled technician. A simple set of ingredients heated together to molten consistency, pushed, blown, poured, shaped, colored, etched, and altered in ways as myriad as the imagination can conjure. Peter Bremers, Harue Shimomoto, and Martin Janecký demonstrate the breadth of the physical and creative possibilities of glass because each brings deep devotion to the art, a unique ability to work with the material, and a drive to explore new experiences in glass.

Raven Skyriver | featured June 2-16 2018 | Nature in Glass | A Delicate Balance |

“Raven Skykriver’s glass sculptures immerse us in nature, allowing us to contemplate our mortality and encouraging us to change our way of being in the world.”

 

Raven Skyriver also brings awareness to the fragility of the ecosystem and the risk of endangerment in his breathtaking glass animals. Icons of the Pacific Northwest such as whales, tortoises, seals, and salmon feature prominently in his vocabulary, along with ancient shelled creatures and undulant octopuses. He expertly manipulates glass to express different textures—soft mat seal fur, rough patchy tortoise skin, glistening chromatophore’s cells, iridescent carapaces. Skyriver’s glorious creatures capture a panoply of forms and colors as diverse as marine life itself.

Raven Skyriver, Descent,2017, Off hand sculpted glass, 30 x 13 x 35″

Though Skyriver consults reference books and deliberately plans the shapes and coloration of each sculpture to achieve naturalistic accuracy, he also distills each creature to its essence and relishes the whimsical accidents of glass that can augment a piece. Skyriver suggests swimming bodies in their native marine habitat by giving the sculptures fluid movements reminiscent of real life—stretched necks and expansive flippers pushing through the water, arcing backs diving under the surface, waving tentacles riding the ripples.

Raven Skyriver, Adrift, 2017,  Off hand sculpted glass, 27 x 29 x 20″

The inherent viscosity of glass, its ability to morph in shape and color, and its seeming weightlessness as light filters through and around it, make it the ideal instrument for Skyriver. Though he originally did functional pieces in the traditional Venetian style, it is through working with glass that he has found his artistic voice. For him, there is great joy in making beautiful renditions of animals, bringing awareness to, and helping safeguard, the creatures with whom we share our planet. There is also great passion for both the medium of glass, an intriguing substance with many characteristics to learn and cultivate, and the process of glassmaking, a team effort that allows him to collaborate with creative talents.

Leviathan, 2018, Off hand sculpted glass 38 x 9 x 24″

Raven Skykriver’s glass sculptures immerse us in nature, allowing us to contemplate our mortality and encouraging us to change our way of being in the world. Humans cannot halt, but in fact will eventually be folded into, the inevitable circle of life. But humans do have a choice if they want to be forces of destruction or agents of preservation. 

Chinlook 2018 (detail), off hand sculpted glass. 30 x 8 x 19”

PAUL STANKARD | featured June 2-16 2018 | Nature in Glass | A Delicate Balance |

Elaborate and exquisite colors, patterns, and systems make nature a marvel of design. Abundance and majesty make it a source of inspiration and tranquility. Its continuum of birth, death, and renewal make it a symbol of life’s transience and mortality’s inevitability. Nature strikes a delicate balance between strength and fragility, sometimes stalwart against, sometimes victim to, the folly of humanity. Nature strikes a delicate balance between the seen and the unseen, sometimes displaying its glories proudly, sometimes teeming imperceptibly beneath the surface. Artists who take inspiration from nature inherently understand these qualities and act as stewards, honoring and preserving our planet.  

Paul Stankard, Emily Dickinson’s Garden Secrets, 2018, 3.5625 x 2.8125 x 2.8125″

“…metaphors for the sacred life cycle of creation and destruction”

Though Paul Stankard graduated from vocational school and worked various jobs in industrial glass early in his career, his creative side loved artistic things like poetry, and the wildflowers of his native rural Massachusetts. One of his favorite Walt Whitman quotes says that “the narrowest hinge of my hand puts the scorn on all machinery.” It is an apt description for someone who transitioned from mechanical work to fine art so successfully. He was drawn to the floral paperweights of 19th century France and present for the revival of this art in southern New Jersey in the mid-20th century. One of its finest practitioners, Francis Whittemore, happened to be Stankard’s factory supervisor. The two loved to talk about this common interest, though Whittemore shared few insights on his methods of production. So, Stankard applied the glassmaking techniques learned on the job to years of self-study in the art of paperweights to become a pioneer in the field of flameworking.

Paul Stankard, Cluster of Bulbous Forms: Flower, Bud, Honeybee and Figures, 4″ diameter (approximate)

Stankard’s process—using a torch with pincers, pliers, and other tools to precisely manipulate colorful, thin rods of glass—is about more than just making things. It is a spiritual exercise that brings the artist closer to the essence of nature. The monastic notion of laborare est orare (to labor is to pray) guides Stankard to see the miraculous in the ordinary. Diminutive and detailed meditations, his paperweights display not only a flower’s elegant countenance but the brimming underbelly beneath the soil, paying homage to what Stankard has termed “the mystery of unseen energy and the fecundity of nature.”

Paul Stankard, Cluster of Purple Pineland Pickerel Weed with Fruit, Honeybees and Walt Whitman Portrait Cane, 4″ Diameter (approximate)

Realism in his botanicals (carefully sculpted petals, pistils and stamens, and lovingly rendered insects) is coupled with mysticism and imagination (roots that morph into people and mosaic canes spelling words like “seed” or “wet” embedded in the design). The works are simultaneously referential to the idea of what a flower can be, and metaphors for the sacred life cycle of creation and destruction. Hot, viscous glass fills the crevices like dripping honey, crystallizing in the surrounding orb and creating a reverential memento mori in permanent suspension.

Detail with Walt Whitman Portrait Cane

SCHANTZ GALLERIES NOW REPRESENTING JAMES CARPENTER

STOCKBRIDGE, MA: Schantz Galleries is now representing commissioned architectural installations and gallery scale works by artist and designer James Carpenter. Carpenter brings over 40 years of experience and a rare synthesis of skills at the intersection of art, engineering, and the built environment. Through this partnership with Schantz Galleries, Carpenter will bring his design concepts (known for large-scale projects such as the exterior envelope and lobby of 7 World Trade Center Tower, the renewed campus of the Israel Museum, and the Gucci Asia Headquarters in Tokyo), to smaller scale residencies and spaces. In a private home, gallery, or small-scale public pavilion, Carpenter’s work allows for the play of light with the gathered image of the view out the windows, creating a unique awareness of the site’s surroundings. Carpenter says they offer a “playfulness and optical concentration of the view beyond. Essentially they offer a new way to read our world in an intimate and tactile way.”

James Carpenter, Immersive Field, Hand blown rondels and anodized aluminum, 37.625 x 37.625 x 6″

Carpenter has also noted that “designing buildings is not the normal terrain for a sculptor, but sculpture establishes a more human connection by engaging the phenomenological qualities of its environment. And here light is what I use, deploying my knowledge of materials to create a profound experience of place.” Carpenter believes that natural light and glass are the primary components of the built environment; transformation of the urban environment and public realm occurs as Carpenter carefully considers each site to exploit the performative aspects of light through glass. A dialogue is created between interior and exterior space, merging the beauty of the natural environment with the aesthetics of the structured world.

 

 

Born in Washington D.C. and raised in New England, Carpenter graduated with a degree in sculpture from Rhode Island School of Design in 1972. He was also a Loeb Fellow at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. He planned to study architecture at RISD but discovered the sculpture studio and the work of glass artist Dale Chihuly, then a teacher there. Chihuly and Carpenter collaborated on a series of neon-light sculptures, and Carpenter also went on to teach at RISD. Carpenter continued making light-based installations while also serving as a consultant at Corning Glass, where he developed new glass materials including photo-responsive glasses and glass ceramics for architectural applications. In 1979, Carpenter established James Carpenter Design Associates (JCDA), as cross-disciplinary firm working on large-scale art, architecture, and engineering projects.

 

Image: Immersive Field, private collection.

This Rondel Screen incorporates hand blown rondels, each unique lens (detail below) encapsulated within an identical frame consisting of anodized aluminum and etched glass front clear glass back. This serial approach in a lenticular device can be arranged in response to its location, orchestrating variations of a singular exterior view. Three individual rondels, titled Immersive Field, are now on display at the Schantz Galleries.

The recently completed Glass Gallery for the Ford Museum in Dearborn, MI, where an old machine shop was renovated and an all glass entry vestibule of cast glass was added. We would love to think about smaller pavilions or gallery spaces for our collectors as well.

Contact the gallery for more information or to request a copy of the catalog.

 

 

 

CHIHULY BASKETS: CELEBRATING FORTY YEARS

“Baskets was the first series that I did that really took advantage of the molten properties of the glassblowing process. Now, for the first time, I really felt I was breaking new ground with an ancient technique.”

 

For many celebrated artists, the path to creative achievement is gradual, studied, and often plagued by self-doubt. David Galenson, Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago and the author of Old Masters and Young Geniuses: The Two Life Cycles of Artistic Creativity (2007) calls these people “experimental innovators.” On the opposite end of this spectrum are what Galenson terms “conceptual innovators”—those whose brilliance arrives in a relative blaze, at a fairly early age, disrupting convention. Dale Chihuly is a conceptual innovator whose Baskets were a flashpoint for his originality. Forty years later, he is still a leader of the avant-garde and prodigious creative force, and the Baskets remain vital in the fascinating arc of his career.

Dale Chihuly, The Boathouse hotshop Seattle, 1993

Dale Chihuly had a meaningful encounter with traditional Northwest Indian basketry in 1977, during a visit to the Washington State History Museum in Tacoma. He was a young vanguard in the field of glass (he had become the head of the glass program at Rhode Island School of Design and co-founded the Pilchuck School of Glass in Washington by age 30). Chihuly was enthralled by how time had transformed the woven baskets into bowed and slumping objects. This touchpoint precipitated a breakthrough not only in Chihuly’s forms but also in his techniques for achieving them. He harnessed the interconnected powers of heat, gravity, centrifugal force, breath, and glass to achieve impossible thinness and dynamic asymmetry. Chihuly has stated: “Baskets was the first series that I did that really took advantage of the molten properties of the glassblowing process. Now, for the first time, I really felt I was breaking new ground with an ancient technique.”

His earliest Baskets, such as his 1979 Tabac Basket Set with Oxblood Jimmies, are daring and seemingly effortless. Like an alchemist Chihuly uncouples form from function and instead forges undulant containers of hue and luminosity. The muted palette reminiscent of Native American baskets defines the early work but is also an enduring muse. The extraordinary forms of Tabac Basket with Drawing Shards and Oxblood Body Wraps (2008) are like feats of Art Nouveau architecture writ in glass. This series is done in natural fiber tones akin to the objects that informed them, but the native formline design of the baskets is abstracted in Chihuly’s hand.

Tabac Basket Set with Oxblood Jimmies, 1979, 6 x 14 x 14″

These forty years of Baskets are not a linear progression, wherein one builds upon the next until superiority is achieved; rather they are collection of transcendent moments through time.

While some works have maintained an aesthetic affiliation with the baskets Chihuly saw in the 1970s, others are merely kindred spirits. Jasper Black Basket Set with Red Lip Wraps (2000) revels in the drama of the color black; opaque obsidian is complemented by deep blues and shimmering violets, sheathed in a sanguine red. Six nested containers produce a panoply of shapes and crevices where light is absorbed and refracted by the lustrous surfaces. With the recent Golden Sapphire Basket Set with Midnight Blue Lip Wraps (2017), Chihuly continues to push the limits of the material. The outer vessel is turned on its side—its form part basket part sea creature, variegated blues dancing around the cresting and plunging contours. Nested inside this frame, six unique forms coalesce in a masterpiece of blown glass, the splendid blues enhanced by peeks of golden yellow.

Jasper Black Basket Set with Red Lip Wraps, 2000, 6 x 13 x 13″

Entwined with the narrative of the Baskets are Chihuly’s drawings, in which we see the artist’s instinctive and spontaneous creativity most viscerally. In a medium not bound by gravity, design elements can be liberated from their surfaces, nested forms emancipated, circles need not close. Not studies for specific works, the gestural drawings express Chihuly’s big ideas to both his glassblowing team and his viewers. Then, as if the works on paper could shatter like glass into “shards,” details from the drawings become design elements of the Baskets themselves, exemplifying the creative loop that characterizes Dale Chihuly.

Pablo Picasso once said that “to search means nothing in painting. To find is the thing.” Such a prophetic statement could only usher from a true conceptual innovator, one who inspired a paradigmatic shift in art-making without seeming like it was any effort at all. Dale Chihuly has done the same for modern studio art glass, and the Baskets are the bellwether of this movement. Chihuly’s magic is intangible and unmistakable—a mix of technical genius, limitless imagination, fearlessness, experimentation, and an unfailing eye for the beautiful.

Jeanne Koles is an independent museum professional with a focus on cultural communications.

Golden Sapphire Basket Set with Midnight Blue Lip Wraps, 2017 (detail), 19 x 22 x 22″

 

Master of Beauty | Lino Tagliapietra

To behold Lino Tagliapietra’s glass art is to perceive pure beauty, inspired by the magnificence of the artist’s surroundings, travels, and experiences. In his 1753 volume Analysis of Beauty, English painter and writer William Hogarth (1697-1764) laid out the six principles that affect our perception of beauty: fitness (fitting parts of a whole elegantly together); variety (blending shapes and colors harmoniously); uniformity (balancing symmetry with shifting perspectives); simplicity (discarding superfluous elements); intricacy (leading the eye with thoughtful composition); and quantity (inspiring awe through grandness). Hogarth’s ground-breaking tome also described the serpentine “line of beauty,” an s-shaped curve used in art that awakens the viewer and is pleasing to behold. Flawlessly orchestrating all six of Hogarth’s tenets and deftly employing the “line of beauty,” each work by Tagliapietra beguiles the viewer, transporting them to a place of unadulterated grace.

The Fenice series epitomizes the lively allure of the curving line. Impossibly elongated pulls of glass twist dynamically through the air. Hot reds give way to fiery oranges, which cool to deep blues, manifesting the myriad colors of flame as the glass phoenix rises. The interplay of curves in the installation of three Fenice works reveals myriad expressions as the viewer moves around the piece. Equally in the Dinosaur works, a sense of infinity defies their physical boundaries. The magnificence of the extinct beasts are expressed, softened through graceful bends in their necks and modernized through the graphic patterns of the glass. A repetition of circles plays delightfully against the kaleidoscopic swathes of color that surround the surfaces.

The graceful arcing forms of the Forcola works are also enhanced by undulating layers of design. Concentric circles—in some cases from a single color family, in others from complimentary hues—stretch like taffy to reveal the exquisite patterns inlaid in the glass. So named because their shape artfully recalls the rowlocks of Venetian gondolas, the Forcola works—like so many by Tagliapietra—expressively celebrate a place of affection for the artist.

Geography has had a considerable influence on the artist, who has traveled the world extensively to work and teach; each location leaves its mark on his soul and in his work. Recalling woven African baskets in form and pattern, the globular Africa vase sits nimbly on a narrow foot and revels in a vibrant, jewel-like palette. Rippled “lines of beauty” wind their way up the vase in both directions, culminating in a vivid blue lip of gently waving canes. The rolling swells of a sand dune are captured in the intricate Sahara, its amber coloring punctuated by an azure oasis. Like the blue sea that gives way to the volcano for which they are named, the Stromboli works erupt with cascading cerulean lava, punctuated by frenetic green swirls and daubs of crimson.

Just as Tagliapietra brings a unique perspective to the places he visits by rendering them abstractly in glass, so he brings his forward-looking ideology to artistic traditions. A long-lost glass making technique using avventurine glass is reborn in Tagliapietra’s hands. In a triumph of alchemy, suspended metal in the glass infuses the material with shimmering luster. Hogarth wrote that “simplicity gives beauty even to variety.” In the Avventurine works, minimal and classical shapes are brilliantly juxtaposed with a mosaic of swirling, sparkling designs.

Whether by the 18th century standards of a thinker like Hogarth, or by modern codes, Lino Tagliapietria is a master of beauty. To combine centuries-old traditions with contemporary explorations of the medium, to pay homage to the intimate places he knows and the faraway worlds he has visited, and to do so with such an inherent understanding of what makes things beautiful—this is a true gift. Tagliapietra’s sumptuously articulated forms and dazzling designs are masterfully balanced yet playful. A “line of beauty” unfurls in front of our eyes in each work and in the body of work as a whole. 

PETER BREMERS | Earth Dialogue – a collaborative exhibit

Marcel Proust wrote that “the real voyage of discovery is not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.” As a way of seeing through new eyes, Schantz Galleries and Sohn Fine Art present a premier collaboration between the two Berkshire art galleries, as well as with two highly regarded artists working in different mediums. Earth Dialogue features over twenty sculptures in glass by Peter Bremers created between 2007 to 2016 and never before seen photographs by Seth Resnick.

Peter Bremers

Peter Bremers, The Last Iceberg, 2015, 34.5 x 32 x 6″

In his recent series, Inward Journey, Bremers’ embodies Proust’s assertion that through new experiences we receive “new eyes.” Instead of reflecting an earthly trip, the Inward Journey pieces travel to a mystical, inner space.  These objects “pay tribute to mankind and our never ending journey to a deeper understanding of oneself and each other, seeking a harmonious and purposeful life on our planet.” While Bremers’ sculptures often achieve an impressive feeling of place—whether icy-blue glaciers or russet-red rocks—his goal is not to merely show us how something looks. His recent metaphorical works prove him to be more than a landscape artist. Instead, he evokes awe, both literal and spiritual. Through his insightful representation of Earth’s most majestic and precarious spaces, Bremers instills an elevated sense of responsibility for its preservation.

This image is registered with the Library of Congress Copyright Office

Seth Resnick, Blue Iceberg, in the Scotia Sea in Antarctica

With his camera, Resnick has an in depth conversation with the Earth that surrounds him. Resnick wants his viewers to see his photographs as an opportunity to consider the larger, unseen realities that contribute to the energy and uniqueness of his subjects. “For me it is all about the patterns of waves from water, ice and sand and I find them mesmerizing. My images are a journey into the personal space of my subject.”

Peter Bremers

Peter Bremers, Waves, 2015 24 x 9.6 x 5.2″

On exhibit in both locations, the works are expected to create a dialogue about the natural world that transcends medium. The artists share a similar aesthetic and vision, as both are masters of light; and both have experienced and endeavored to depict the sublimity encountered in nature, from the Antarctic icebergs to desert canyons. Capturing these moments in time, and continuing the dialogue for the earth, has probably never been more important than now.

Sohn Fine Art is located nearby at 69 Church Street, Lenox MA. www.sohnfineart.com

To view a catalog of works by Peter Bremers, click the link below, or view available works here.

 

Classical, Native and Pop Culture in Glass

3 friends at Schantz 2016 header narrow

Karl Marx wrote in 1845 that “only in community with others has each individual the means of cultivating his gifts in all directions.” The interconnectedness of Richard Marquis, Dante Marioni, and Preston Singletary, cultivated throughout the years, has not created a vacuum of homogeneity in glass. Rather, as these three distinct artists demonstrate, the community of glass has given each individual the “means of cultivating his gift in all directions.”

Richard Marquis, Whole Elk Tower with Manikins, 2015

Richard Marquis, Whole Elk Tower with Manikins, 2015.  Blown glass,murrine whole elk technique,found objects, 17.5 x 19 x 13″

 Schantz Galleries is pleased to present an exhibition of works by three contemporary artists working in glass.  Having worked together on and off over the past 30 years, and maintained a friendship, the three men are each masters of their techniques and have developed extremely different thematic concerns over the years.  Each in their own time has studied and then taught their specialized techniques.

Setter Head Bottle Vehicle Richard Marquis 2016 Glass: hot slab construction, cast glass, wood, brass 7 x 18 x 7"

Richard Marquis, Setter Head Bottle Vehicle, 2016.  Glass: hot slab construction, cast glass, wood, and brass. 7 x 18 x 7″

With over 50 years of experience and a sophisticated understanding of material, color, and form, Richard Marquis balances his training and scrupulous artistic integrity with the playfulness and capacious spirit of an upstart, full of original notions just waiting to burst out in creative action. Simultaneously ironic yet refined, silly yet smart, eclectic yet recognizable, Marquis is nothing if not totally, authentically himself. In part, Marquis’ style emerged from 1960s California funk (he got his B.A. and M.A. from U.C. Berkeley), a counter-movement to east coast Minimalism fusing, among other things, pop-culture, a cartoon aesthetic, and the use of found objects.

Marioni Leaf Vessel Grouping, 2016

Dante Marioni, Leaf Vessels, 2016.  Blown glass, greatest height is 42″

 

Dante Marioni ­grew up in the thick of the studio art glass movement and first met Marquis when he was 7. When Marioni got into glass as a teen, he felt disconnected with what he called the “loose and free-form” aesthetic that characterized the movement in the 1970s. He has said that “over the course of my career I have been consumed mostly with forms—that is, making interesting shapes. As a glass blower, I have always considered that to be my primary challenge.”

Preston Singletary, Supernatural Being, 2016, 13 x 12 x 12"

Preston Singletary, Supernatural Being, 2016.  13 x 12 x 12″

Preston Singletary uses glass a means of understanding, and sharing, his Tlingit heritage in the context of modern society. He explains that he compares “my current notion of society with that of my ancestors, intuiting ideas and concepts in glass, referencing my connection to my Tribe, my clan and my family. My influences range from Indigenous art around the world to the glass-blowing process, modernist sculpture, design and music.” Though he considered a career in music, he realized that glass-making gave him a purpose and a responsibility, to “interpret the codes and symbols of the land in a new way.”

Preston Singeltary

Preston Singletary, Tlingit Shelf Baskets, 2015. Blown and sand carved glass, greatest height is 8.75″

The unique cultures of the Pacific Northwest, both past and present, encourage friendship, a sharing of ideas, and cooperative efforts. This is certainly true of Richard Marquis, Dante Marioni, and Preston Singletary. From pop to classical to native, from murrini to cane to sandblasting, from witty to refined to narrative, Marquis, Marioni, and Singletary demonstrate the endless possibilities when the creative mind meets molten glass and fire.

PHOTOS: Richard Marquis, Manikins, 2016; Dante Marioni,  Leaf Vessels, 2016; Preston Singletary, Blue Tooth, 2016. photo credits: R.Marquis, K.Saul, Russell Johnson

 

IF YOU GO:

POP, CLASSICAL, and NATIVE CULTURES IN GLASS (THREE OLD FRIENDS): Richard Marquis, Dante Marioni, and Preston Singletary

Exhibition September 9 – October 4, 2016

Gallery Hours:  11 a.m.–5 p.m.

Schantz Galleries Contemporary Glass, 3 Elm Street, Stockbridge, Massachusetts 01262

Tel: 413-298-3044  www.schantzgalleries.com

For more information, email Kim Saul at kim@schantzgalleries.com

Renowned Artist Dale Chihuly to Exhibit in Stockbridge

Chihuly at Schantz Galleries 2016

Opening Reception, Friday, July 8, 2016, 4–6 p.m.

Dale Chihuly, Sunrise Topaz Chandelier, 2016 detail

Dale Chihuly, Sunrise Topaz Chandelier (detail), 2016, 14 x 6 x 5½’

 

Stockbridge, MA (July 2016) Renowned glass artist Dale Chihuly will exhibit several of his works of art to include two large Chandeliers and a Persian Wall, at the Schantz Galleries in Stockbridge, MA, from July 8 through August 28, 2016. While Chihuly is famous for his ambitious architectural installations in notable cities, museums, and gardens around the world, Schantz Galleries provides visitors with a more intimate setting in which to enjoy the works on view.

With a background in interior design and architecture, Chihuly has always been interested in space and light. Working within the architecture of the gallery, he presents several of his well-known series along with a few large-scale installations. The centerpiece of the gallery is Sunrise Topaz Chandelier, a two-tiered Chandelier consisting of approximately 430 amber, gold, and clear elements.

An American sculptor, Chihuly has mastered the alluring, translucent, and transparent qualities of glass, ice, water, and neon, to create works of art that transform the viewer experience. He is globally renowned for his ambitious, site-specific architectural installations in public spaces and for his work in more than 250 museum collections.

In addition to the blown-glass sculptures, Chihuly has included sixteen of his works on paper. As Nathan Kernan has stated in an essay, “Drawing into Space: Chihuly Drawing Revisited,” Chihuly’s drawings over the past thirty-five years constitute a parallel visual world as compelling and original as that of his amazing sculptures.” The artist has always used drawing as a form of conveying his concepts and ideas for his sculptures, and one can certainly experience his expressive energy and love of color. “You can more directly sense my energy in my drawings than in any other way, perhaps,” he has said. “And from the very beginning, the drawings were done, as my glass is done, very quickly, very fast.”

­­­­“We are truly honored to have the opportunity to exhibit works by Dale Chihuly in Stockbridge. Chihuly is one of the most well known living American artists,” gallery owner and director Jim Schantz stated, “and certainly the most recognized glass artist in the world today.”

IF YOU GO:

Chihuly at Schantz Galleries 2016

July 8 through August 28, 2016

Opening Reception Friday, July 8, 2016, 4–6 p.m.

Schantz Galleries Contemporary Glass, 3 Elm Street, Stockbridge, Massachusetts 01262

Tel: 413-298-3044   www.schantzgalleries.com

Exhibition Hours: Open Daily, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

NANCY CALLAN | A Fantastic Journey

Catalog Available

Click to view online catalog. Printed catalogs are available.                           photo: Russell Johnson

It is apparent when an artist loves what he or she does. Nancy Callan’s work reflects her pure joy and energy and good nature. While the work connotes a playful ease, it is created with great technical skill and mastery. We truly admire Nancy’s great energy and dedication—she has become a major force in the art glass community as an artist, gaffer, educator and mentor.

5.5 x 5.5 x 5.5" each elementBlown & Fused Glass

Nancy Callan, Top Sampler #3, 2016,  5.5 x 5.5 x 5.5″ (each element)

The works in this exhibition, Dancers, Orbs, Tops, and Clouds, all have a rich diversity of character and style reflecting Nancy’s early career as a graphic designer. Each work projects its own character, denoting a place, person or mood, offering its own narrative.

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Julia’s Garden, 2016, and on site installation by Nancy Callan, at Chesterwood, Stockbridge, MA

In addition to being a featured artist at our June Collectors Weekend, Nancy is also one of the twelve exhibiting artists at the outdoor exhibition at Chesterwood, a site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.  The exhibition, “The Nature of Glass: Contemporary Sculpture at Chesterwood 2016” Opens June 18 in Stockbridge and runs through September 18, 2016.

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Nancy Callan, Indigo Anemone Paloma, 2016, 25.5 x 13 x 8.5″.

We feel very fortunate to represent Nancy’s work and to know her. Enjoy this fantastic journey into Nancy’s world!  We hope you can come to the gallery this summer to see the work in person, but if not, please view additional works by Nancy Callan on our website.