Navigate

Bertil Vallien at FORM Miami | December 6-10, 2017

“…knowing the exact moment at which to capture a shift of light or expression and wrench the secret from the glass is what it is all about.”

Bertil Vallien, Map IV, 2017, Cast glass, 20.27 x 16.53 x 3.14″

MIAMI, FL: From the Crystal Kingdom in Sweden to the FORM Miami Exhibition, comes this exhibition of Bertil Vallien’s signature sand-cast glass works reflecting the artist’s thoughtful exploration of the multi-faceted relationship of the human journey. Vallien will also be traveling to attend the show.

Bertil Vallien’s focus on looking inward is achieved in myriad ways, one of which is his unique glassmaking technique. A leader in the Swedish glass industry for more than 40 years, Vallien formulated his own method for casting glass in sand that creates depth and radiance in the material. Artworks are driven not by their final appearance—although their visual impact is stunning—but rather by their content. Vallien’s preparatory sketches are carefully considered blueprints of both the external form and the inner details. Layers—both physical and psychological—are created through a multistep process. Surface textures result from the imprint of objects placed on the walls of the mold, which are also dusted with powdered metal oxides to release color. As the molten glass is poured into the mold, Vallien incorporates a variety of objects from sheet metal and glass threads, to figures and other colored forms. Once the glass cools, the suspended animation reveals itself in full glory. Light reflects off the brilliant surfaces and assorted angles of the perimeter, but more dramatically it emanates from within.

Vallien has said that “knowing the exact moment at which to capture a shift of light or expression and wrench the secret from the glass is what it is all about.” Just as his technical approach unearths internal “secrets,” so his visual motifs are explorations of the subconscious. The artist is motivated by various things—from stories he hears on the news, to people he has met, to his religious upbringing and questions about faith, to wars both historical and contemporary. Despite these concrete inspirations, the work is not meant to pose facile questions with prescribed answers. Umberto Eco wrote “I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret is as though it had an underlying truth.” Vallien’s art embraces this idea, transforming the events and experiences that inspire him into universal archetypes and symbols, upon which viewers layer their own perspectives. A shifting “truth” is created when two spirits—that of the artist and that of the viewer—coalesce. Through both physical expression and symbolic associations, Vallien senses the world from the inside out and opens this channel of experience to his viewer. Definitive answers become unnecessary, and an enlightened, empathetic, and open-minded ethos rises.

If You Go:
December 6-10,  Bertil Vallien, FORM
The artist will be present.

 

 

CHIHULY BASKETS: CELEBRATING FORTY YEARS

“Baskets was the first series that I did that really took advantage of the molten properties of the glassblowing process. Now, for the first time, I really felt I was breaking new ground with an ancient technique.”

 

For many celebrated artists, the path to creative achievement is gradual, studied, and often plagued by self-doubt. David Galenson, Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago and the author of Old Masters and Young Geniuses: The Two Life Cycles of Artistic Creativity (2007) calls these people “experimental innovators.” On the opposite end of this spectrum are what Galenson terms “conceptual innovators”—those whose brilliance arrives in a relative blaze, at a fairly early age, disrupting convention. Dale Chihuly is a conceptual innovator whose Baskets were a flashpoint for his originality. Forty years later, he is still a leader of the avant-garde and prodigious creative force, and the Baskets remain vital in the fascinating arc of his career.

Dale Chihuly, The Boathouse hotshop Seattle, 1993

Dale Chihuly had a meaningful encounter with traditional Northwest Indian basketry in 1977, during a visit to the Washington State History Museum in Tacoma. He was a young vanguard in the field of glass (he had become the head of the glass program at Rhode Island School of Design and co-founded the Pilchuck School of Glass in Washington by age 30). Chihuly was enthralled by how time had transformed the woven baskets into bowed and slumping objects. This touchpoint precipitated a breakthrough not only in Chihuly’s forms but also in his techniques for achieving them. He harnessed the interconnected powers of heat, gravity, centrifugal force, breath, and glass to achieve impossible thinness and dynamic asymmetry. Chihuly has stated: “Baskets was the first series that I did that really took advantage of the molten properties of the glassblowing process. Now, for the first time, I really felt I was breaking new ground with an ancient technique.”

His earliest Baskets, such as his 1979 Tabac Basket Set with Oxblood Jimmies, are daring and seemingly effortless. Like an alchemist Chihuly uncouples form from function and instead forges undulant containers of hue and luminosity. The muted palette reminiscent of Native American baskets defines the early work but is also an enduring muse. The extraordinary forms of Tabac Basket with Drawing Shards and Oxblood Body Wraps (2008) are like feats of Art Nouveau architecture writ in glass. This series is done in natural fiber tones akin to the objects that informed them, but the native formline design of the baskets is abstracted in Chihuly’s hand.

Tabac Basket Set with Oxblood Jimmies, 1979, 6 x 14 x 14″

These forty years of Baskets are not a linear progression, wherein one builds upon the next until superiority is achieved; rather they are collection of transcendent moments through time.

While some works have maintained an aesthetic affiliation with the baskets Chihuly saw in the 1970s, others are merely kindred spirits. Jasper Black Basket Set with Red Lip Wraps (2000) revels in the drama of the color black; opaque obsidian is complemented by deep blues and shimmering violets, sheathed in a sanguine red. Six nested containers produce a panoply of shapes and crevices where light is absorbed and refracted by the lustrous surfaces. With the recent Golden Sapphire Basket Set with Midnight Blue Lip Wraps (2017), Chihuly continues to push the limits of the material. The outer vessel is turned on its side—its form part basket part sea creature, variegated blues dancing around the cresting and plunging contours. Nested inside this frame, six unique forms coalesce in a masterpiece of blown glass, the splendid blues enhanced by peeks of golden yellow.

Jasper Black Basket Set with Red Lip Wraps, 2000, 6 x 13 x 13″

Entwined with the narrative of the Baskets are Chihuly’s drawings, in which we see the artist’s instinctive and spontaneous creativity most viscerally. In a medium not bound by gravity, design elements can be liberated from their surfaces, nested forms emancipated, circles need not close. Not studies for specific works, the gestural drawings express Chihuly’s big ideas to both his glassblowing team and his viewers. Then, as if the works on paper could shatter like glass into “shards,” details from the drawings become design elements of the Baskets themselves, exemplifying the creative loop that characterizes Dale Chihuly.

Pablo Picasso once said that “to search means nothing in painting. To find is the thing.” Such a prophetic statement could only usher from a true conceptual innovator, one who inspired a paradigmatic shift in art-making without seeming like it was any effort at all. Dale Chihuly has done the same for modern studio art glass, and the Baskets are the bellwether of this movement. Chihuly’s magic is intangible and unmistakable—a mix of technical genius, limitless imagination, fearlessness, experimentation, and an unfailing eye for the beautiful.

Jeanne Koles is an independent museum professional with a focus on cultural communications.

Golden Sapphire Basket Set with Midnight Blue Lip Wraps, 2017 (detail), 19 x 22 x 22″

 

Master of Beauty | Lino Tagliapietra

To behold Lino Tagliapietra’s glass art is to perceive pure beauty, inspired by the magnificence of the artist’s surroundings, travels, and experiences. In his 1753 volume Analysis of Beauty, English painter and writer William Hogarth (1697-1764) laid out the six principles that affect our perception of beauty: fitness (fitting parts of a whole elegantly together); variety (blending shapes and colors harmoniously); uniformity (balancing symmetry with shifting perspectives); simplicity (discarding superfluous elements); intricacy (leading the eye with thoughtful composition); and quantity (inspiring awe through grandness). Hogarth’s ground-breaking tome also described the serpentine “line of beauty,” an s-shaped curve used in art that awakens the viewer and is pleasing to behold. Flawlessly orchestrating all six of Hogarth’s tenets and deftly employing the “line of beauty,” each work by Tagliapietra beguiles the viewer, transporting them to a place of unadulterated grace.

The Fenice series epitomizes the lively allure of the curving line. Impossibly elongated pulls of glass twist dynamically through the air. Hot reds give way to fiery oranges, which cool to deep blues, manifesting the myriad colors of flame as the glass phoenix rises. The interplay of curves in the installation of three Fenice works reveals myriad expressions as the viewer moves around the piece. Equally in the Dinosaur works, a sense of infinity defies their physical boundaries. The magnificence of the extinct beasts are expressed, softened through graceful bends in their necks and modernized through the graphic patterns of the glass. A repetition of circles plays delightfully against the kaleidoscopic swathes of color that surround the surfaces.

The graceful arcing forms of the Forcola works are also enhanced by undulating layers of design. Concentric circles—in some cases from a single color family, in others from complimentary hues—stretch like taffy to reveal the exquisite patterns inlaid in the glass. So named because their shape artfully recalls the rowlocks of Venetian gondolas, the Forcola works—like so many by Tagliapietra—expressively celebrate a place of affection for the artist.

Geography has had a considerable influence on the artist, who has traveled the world extensively to work and teach; each location leaves its mark on his soul and in his work. Recalling woven African baskets in form and pattern, the globular Africa vase sits nimbly on a narrow foot and revels in a vibrant, jewel-like palette. Rippled “lines of beauty” wind their way up the vase in both directions, culminating in a vivid blue lip of gently waving canes. The rolling swells of a sand dune are captured in the intricate Sahara, its amber coloring punctuated by an azure oasis. Like the blue sea that gives way to the volcano for which they are named, the Stromboli works erupt with cascading cerulean lava, punctuated by frenetic green swirls and daubs of crimson.

Just as Tagliapietra brings a unique perspective to the places he visits by rendering them abstractly in glass, so he brings his forward-looking ideology to artistic traditions. A long-lost glass making technique using avventurine glass is reborn in Tagliapietra’s hands. In a triumph of alchemy, suspended metal in the glass infuses the material with shimmering luster. Hogarth wrote that “simplicity gives beauty even to variety.” In the Avventurine works, minimal and classical shapes are brilliantly juxtaposed with a mosaic of swirling, sparkling designs.

Whether by the 18th century standards of a thinker like Hogarth, or by modern codes, Lino Tagliapietria is a master of beauty. To combine centuries-old traditions with contemporary explorations of the medium, to pay homage to the intimate places he knows and the faraway worlds he has visited, and to do so with such an inherent understanding of what makes things beautiful—this is a true gift. Tagliapietra’s sumptuously articulated forms and dazzling designs are masterfully balanced yet playful. A “line of beauty” unfurls in front of our eyes in each work and in the body of work as a whole. 

CAST, CUT and COLD October 2017

 

Karsten Oaks in the Cold Shop.

Glass is an amazing medium. Whether in front of a furnace or a grinding wheel, the nature of the glass allows it to be formed by who holds it and the only limit to its potential is the imagination, and of course the technical acumen of the maker. It must be the only medium from which so any different artistic techniques can be used, and so many uses are yet to be discovered. Out of necessity and the inherent nature of the medium, working with hot glass is a quicker process than when it is cast or cold worked; as a result, much of the available glass is hot glass. Because it is not quite as mesmerizing as glass blowing, and it is so time consuming to make, many people do not realize that cold working can take months for one piece. Realistic, abstract, simple, or complex sculptures may be realized through these process’. This October, Schantz Galleries features works by artists whose work is Cast, Cut and Cold.

 

 

 

Memories and Dreams | the Art of Bertil Vallien

Imagine a world where we experienced things from the inside out. Imagine if our first impression was of something’s essence, and it was only through closer looking that we distinguished its external qualities. Would our self-awareness evolve and our empathy for others expand? Would we be more attune to the commonalities of our shared living experience, more sympathetic to things we do not understand, less concerned with solving life’s mysteries and more content living within them?

 

 

The art of Bertil Vallien guides us through this journey of interiority and is as reflective, thoughtful and, ultimately as magical, as human nature itself. Vallien’s focus on looking inward is achieved in myriad ways, one of which is his unique glassmaking technique. A leader in the Swedish glass industry for more than 40 years, Vallien formulated his own method for casting glass in sand that creates depth and radiance in the material. Artworks are driven not by their final appearance—although their visual impact is stunning—but rather by their content. Vallien’s preparatory sketches are carefully considered blueprints of both the external form and the inner details. Layers—both physical and psychological—are created through a multistep process. Surface textures result from the imprint of objects placed on the walls of the mold, which are also dusted with powdered metal oxides to release color. As the molten glass is poured into the mold, Vallien incorporates a variety of objects from sheet metal and glass threads, to figures and other colored forms. Once the glass cools, the suspended animation reveals itself in full glory. Light reflects off the brilliant surfaces and assorted angles of the perimeter, but more dramatically it emanates from within.  

Vallien has said that “knowing the exact moment at which to capture a shift of light or expression and wrench the secret from the glass is what it is all about.” Just as his technical approach unearths internal “secrets,” so his visual motifs are explorations of the subconscious. The artist is motivated by various things—from stories he hears on the news, to people he has met, to his religious upbringing and questions about faith, to wars both historical and contemporary. Despite these concrete inspirations, the work is not meant to pose facile questions with prescribed answers. Umberto Eco wrote “I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret is as though it had an underlying truth.” Vallien’s art embraces this idea, transforming the events and experiences that inspire him into universal archetypes and symbols, upon which viewers layer their own perspectives. A shifting “truth” is created when two spirits—that of the artist and that of the viewer—coalesce. 

Today, the path to profound understanding of the world around us is often hampered by the anxieties of contemporary living. Our quest to understand our fellow man is fraught with difficult existential questions brought on by chaos, war, and unsettling socio-political situations. Vallien’s series of works inspired by Franz Kafka pay homage to a visionary 20th century author who mingled realism and fantasy, and whose protagonists struggled through surrealistic circumstances in search of salvation. In Kafka III, a golden figure is trapped in an ashen cave that is part primitive spearhead part wire barrier system. His aura struggles to overcome the harsh cage, glimpses of his gilded light cleaving the surface. 

Kafka III,  by Bertil Vallien

One series of works by Vallien was inspired by an aerial photograph of a bombed out village in northern Iraq that he saw in a newspaper. Much has been destroyed in the commission of war, from homes to lives to ancient cultural treasures. Abode II is an imagined archaeological excavation of a post-apocalyptic world, where the earth is turned inside out, its soul exposed and its ability to safely house man thrown into limbo. Landed IV is a hybrid milieu of runic designs, emerging earthly elements, and modern shiny architecture—all presided over by a white flag of surrender.

Landed IV, 2017

The Roman God Janus, the god of transition, gateways, and duality, oversaw the beginning and end of conflict; the doors of his temple would be open in times of war and close to mark the onset of peace. He also opened and closed heaven’s doors, his two faces simultaneously administering over both the past and the future. Vallien’s Janus sculptures have rough-hewn stone-like carved facades on one side and smooth transparent arcs on the reverse, within which images of closed-eye faces are suspended in the glass. This interest in the transitory nature of life has also inspired Vallien’s boat works. The elegant Apostroph II also reflects a sense of adventure and the more winsome side of exploring the unknown. Vallien has written that he makes boats “that sink through memories and dreams, [that] require not latitudes to navigate by; they steer towards the horizon of imagination.” He encourages his various travelers (and by association, us) to “put his trust in the delicate skin that separates him from the unknown.”

Janus Y, 2017

Franz Kafka lamented “how pathetically scanty my self-knowledge is compared with, say, my knowledge of my room. There is no such thing as observation of the inner world, as there is of the outer world.” Kafka may in some ways be an intellectual forbear for Vallien, but to this philosophical perspective the artist brings an innate ability to ruminate on the inner world, both for himself and his viewer. The dualities of this world are nimbly unveiled in the work: dark and light; past and future; rough and smooth; light and heavy. Through both physical expression and symbolic associations, Vallien senses the world from the inside out and opens up this channel of experience to his viewer. Definitive answers become unnecessary, and an enlightened, empathetic, and open-minded ethos rises up.
—Jeanne V.  Koles for Schantz Galleries, Stockbridge, MA

lino in new england 2017

“When is Lino coming back?” This is a question we hear throughout the year, not only from glass artists and our loyal art collectors, but also from our friends in town, especially at the coffeeshop, where Lino loves to chat with the local townspeople and tourists. He is interested in everything and everyone, and a keen observer of human nature. Lino loves New England and America’s history. Between working and teaching at the MIT Glass Lab, his exhibitions at our gallery and throughout New England and teaching at Haystack in Maine, Lino has traveled extensively throughout the region and has a keen interest in American culture and history.

What do so many people love about the art of Lino Tagliapietra? The artist!

Lino has never stopped being curious about life, art and culture and continues to share his knowledge with others. We see in Lino‘s art not only the highest level of skill and mastery of material, but a personal quest for new discoveries. Lino continues to challenge himself by finding the next exciting or sublime form, striving for new forms of expression and creativity. Lino’s work has a presence which references yet transcends time.

Each piece that Lino makes is so special and unique because he is so passionate about life and his work. Each aspect is so important and genuine. This is what makes Lino’s work stand out. We believe when one walks into Lino’s exhibition this summer, they will see completely new forms and approaches to his medium. There are also some incredible unique examples of Lino’s classic forms within this collection.

We are so fortunate in our lifetime to witness a maestro and artist in one, who through his openness to life and humanity can transform silica into miraculous works of art… and that he travels the world and visits us in Stockbridge!

We hope you can also stop by the gallery and view some of the newest works as well as many classic, iconic sculptures by Lino Tagliapietra.

Catalog Online

 

Cooperative Glassmaking and the Individualism of the Creative Spirit | Dante Marioni & Preston Singletary

Stockbridge, MA  Schantz Galleries is pleased to present an  exhibition of works by two contemporary artists working in glass. Having worked together on and off over the past 30 years, and maintained a friendship, the two men are each masters of their techniques and have developed extremely different thematic concerns.  Each in their own time has studied and then taught their specialized techniques.

Dante Marioni and Preston Singletary at work together in 2011 during Schantz Galleries June Collectors Weekend.

Glassblowing is by nature a team endeavor, members moving in often-wordless harmony towards a single goal. Glass artists are the conductors, sometimes physically participating but always orchestrating the various participants around their vision. Though the production process requires a skilled and trusted team, the creative process is more often an individual one. When two creative forces come together in collaboration, however, a deep union of their spirits can blossom. Dante Marioni and Preston Singletary, friends and colleagues since high school, have periodically teamed up on collaborative work over the past seven years. This is more than just a marriage of prodigious technical talent and diverse aesthetics, it is a collective honoring of two artistic lights resulting in a sublime body of work.

Marioni and Singletary’s synergy grows out of certain philosophical commonalities. Both express their reverence for nature with graphic or stylized representations. “Marioni’s leaf vessels are elegantly elongated forms whose delicate veining is captured through fine reticello or striking cane work patterns. Singletary’s spirit animals, soul catchers, and glass baskets pay homage to his Tlingit ancestry through economy of form and refined Northwest Coast formline design. Though employing different styles and techniques, both artists convey the essence of their subjects instead of providing direct reproductions. Color is also an evocative tool for both artists, though their palettes differ. Marioni uses translucent purples, sparkling blues, shimmering reds, and luminous greens to impart the innate characters of a leaf. Singletary calls upon earthy reds, rich golds, and deep azures to conjure flora and fauna and suggest the land, sea, and sky upon which they reign.

Singletary uses his glass making skills to connect with his native heritage, translating Tlingit cultural traditions of Chilkat basket-weaving, stone, and wood working into a contemporary medium that bridges new audiences to traditional narratives. In Marioni’s hands, ancient and primitive forms are completely metamorphosed. In his African Gourd, an archetypal shape is translated into a sleek vessel, an opaque container with primitive markings is transformed into a diaphanous surface with stylized graphics, and a utilitarian object becomes an exquisite work of art.

The extraordinary amalgamation of these viewpoints and aesthetics is visually arresting—merging Marioni’s graceful forms, delicate cane patterning, and luminous surfaces with Singletary’s sand-carving technique, Tlingit mythical designs, and deep earthy colorations. Adornments on Marioni’s sleek vessels are traditionally rare and, when existent, clean and streamlined. To their artistic collaboration, Singletary brings the addition of blown glass figural and animal elements. Instead of delicate spherical handles, two black wolves (a symbol of a Tlingit clan) stand upon the shoulders of a graceful vase, melding Venetian and Tlingit traditions in a singular and striking association.

Dante Marioni and Preston Singletary met as teenage boys, when life was about playing music and having fun. Today, each has forged a prodigious career in the field of glass art and gained notoriety for their distinctive skills and styles. With their artist collaboration comes a revival of their youthful camaraderie, along with an egoless openness to the creative process and receptivity to the interchange of ideas. In both their collaborative and individual work, Dante Marioni and Preston Singletary embody both the cooperative nature of glassmaking and the individualism of the creative spirit.

View Catalog Online

 

Dante Marioni, Green and Purple Leaves, Trio, 2017

Preston Singletary, Medicine Woman (Raven Woman), 2012, 12.5 x 23 x 8″

 

 

 

Made in N.E.

Stockbridge, MA:  Often when one hears the term Art Glass, a work of art created in a hot furnace with a blowpipe is what first comes to mind. This exhibit gives visitors a glimpse into the diverse techniques that creative hands and minds can employ in this medium. Made in N.E. is a curated exhibition of blown, cast, cut, fused, laminated, and sculpted works in glass created by fourteen artists in New England including; William Carlson, Daniel Clayman, Dan Dailey, Bernie D’Onofrio, Robin Grebe, Dorothy Hafner, Eric Hilton, Sidney Hutter, K. William LeQuier, Martin Rosol, Thomas Scoon, Harue Shimomoto, Jen Violette, and Steven Weinberg.Made in N.E. celebrates the intersection of global and local technique and tradition. Some of the artists, like Eric Hilton, Martin Rosol, and Harue Shimomoto, bring international perspectives to the show, as emigrants or immigrants to the U.S. who chose to settle in New England. Martin Rosol of MA, for example, became a naturalized American citizen in 1994. His exhibited works present the viewer with Rosol’s innovations on the Czech glass tradition. Other featured artists, such as Jen Violette, are dyed-in-the-wool New Englanders. Violette herself found initial artistic inspiration in the artworks and lifestyle of her grandparents who earned their living as studio artists in Maine. She currently resides in Vermont on a small farm, drawing inspiration for her hot sculpted glass pieces from the gardens on her land.  

 

The artists’ processes are as diverse and nuanced as their origin stories. Many of these artists use multiple techniques, several incorporate varied materials such as metal, mahogany, or stone into their glass sculptures. Whether viewing the installations of Bill Carlson, Daniel Clayman, and Dan Dailey or the smaller-scale work of Robin Grebe, Dorothy Hafner, and Sidney Hutter, one cannot help but marvel at the diverse and incredibly unique art united by the medium of glass and the community behind it.

Dorothy Hafner at work on her designs.

A fair number of newer glass artists and many who started working during the earlier days of the American Studio Glass Movement, which began about 55 years ago, progressed through ceramics as a stepping stone to the alluring medium of glass. Dorothy Hafner, trained as a painter, sculptor, and ceramicist, first designed for Tiffany & Co. and the Rosenthal Company before venturing into the world of glass. Hafner collaborated with the famous Lino Tagliapietra and has since shifted her focus to flat glass, fusing her layer upon layer of intricately cut designs to create her trademark bright translucent panels.

 

Given the translucent nature of glass, it is no surprise that a number of glass artists begin as lighting designers or emphasize lighting in their work. Daniel Clayman, who recently created the vast Rainfield installation at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design’s new Design and Media Center, started as a theater lighting designer before embarking on a very successful career in glass. Clayman’s continued interest in light’s behavior and feats of engineering are apparent in his cast and cut glass works, which in some instances expand to fill a vast room, and in others fit on a pedestal.

Dan Dailey, known for his range of technique and the versatility of his work, has been creating sculptures and functional art with an emphasis on lighting since 1970. His series of chandeliers and sconces captivate viewers with their whimsy and technical prowess evident in their execution. Every piece of Dailey’s work begins with a drawing, and many incorporate multiple medias and glass-working processes. He is a master of the most seductive of all techniques, blown and hot-sculpted glass. The immediacy, the fire, and the viscous honey-like consistency of molten glass lure many artists and craftspeople into its web. Watching is irresistible, doing is difficult. Dailey, a veteran of the glass-blowing arena, has certainly proven his commitment to his art over the course of more than forty-five years as a working artist. Often narrative, his sculptures and architectural installations explore extraordinary concepts with a wide range of themes and styles articulated through blown, cast, and pâte de verre glass expertly woven with elements of bronze, steel, aluminum, and light.

A number of artists who work in cast glass, such as William Carlson, Robin Grebe, and Thomas Scoon, also incorporate alternate media into their glass sculptures. After making a mold from sand, plaster, or another material that can hold its shape while filled with molten glass, the artist pours the hot glass into the void, sometimes adding elements to the piece while it is still warm, sometimes waiting for it to cool before juxtaposing the fragility against the strength of metal or stone.

Eric Hilton

Eric Hilton at work.

Some glass artists follow their casting process with “cold working,” or the manipulation of glass at room temperature. “Cold working” almost always involves cutting or carving the glass, by hand with a tool or by means of a machine. Eric Hilton employs varied methods, using a waterjet or a copper wheel. Sidney Hutter pioneered a laminating process that includes ultraviolet adhesive and specialty pigments to create and color his precisely cut plate glass into the suggestions of vessels. Martin Rosol, too, plays with color in his laminate as well as the finishes of his sculptures. He sandblasts to achieve a softer opacity, or grinds and polishes to create surfaces that shine like ice. After carefully planning each piece, the internationally exhibited Steven Weinberg casts and carves optical crystal in his Rhode Island studio.

Glassblowing and particularly hot sculpting also offer many opportunities for the rendering of an artistic vision, for innovation and experimentation. The potential and allure of this medium plus fire and breath is reflected in Bernie D’Onofrio’s stunning rivulets of glass that seem suspended within an exterior transparent vessel, or in the wild, almost alive glass strands tamed by K. William LeQuier’s talent. Jen Violette’s irresistible garden vegetables and rabbits charm viewers, her sculpted hands embody grace.

Experimentation in this art form continues to produce amazing works, such as the delicately woven threads of glass by Harue Shimomoto. The presentation is as exacting as the process, as Shimomoto suspends layers of glass tendrils from above to create depth and subtle movement as the viewer shifts and perspective changes, creating an ethereal suggestion of a textile landscape.

 

Dan Clayman

 

Bill Carlson

 

Dan Dailey

Dan Dailey

 

Bernie D'Onofrio

Bernie D’Onofrio

 

Robin Grebe

 

Dorothy Hafner

 

Eric Hilton

 

Sidney Hutter

Sidney Hutter

 

K WIlliam LeQuier

 

Martin Rosol

Tom Scoon

Harue Shimomoto

Jen Violette

Steven Weinberg

Visit Schantz Galleries in Stockbridge, MA, to see how New England artists exemplify the diversity of technique, perspective, and origin that the world of contemporary art glass has to offer.  

 

 

 

 

IF YOU GO:    Made in N.E.

Exhibition May 8 – June 24, 2017

Gallery Hours:  Open daily 10:30-5:30 

Schantz Galleries Contemporary Glass, 3 Elm Street, Stockbridge, Massachusetts 01262

Tel: 413-298-3044 www.schantzgalleries.com   

Artist Reception: Friday June 23, 4-6pm

 

Curating an Exhibition at the Morris Museum

“Although Lino embodies centuries of Venetian traditions in glass-making techniques, he also continually quests to bring new ideas and approaches to the medium”  –Jim Schantz, director of Schantz Galleries in Stockbridge, Massachusetts.

“The boldness of his vision is why he’s so widely celebrated, married with that technical virtuosity. It’s this combination of tradition and innovation that really sets Lino apart from pretty much anybody else working in glass.”   Andrew Page, managing editor of GLASS Quarterly

It began over a year ago with a conversation between a gallerist and a collector; Jim Schantz and Alan Levitan.   Alan asked after learning that Jim had curated the show at the Bergstrom Mahler Museum of Glass, “How about a show of Lino’s work at the Morris Museum?”

“Of course!” Jim said, “… and we can help with it!”

After hundreds of hours and many phone calls, meetings, committees, detailed lists of arrangements,  The Morris Museum currently showcases a selection of the maestro’s works in the exhibition, Lino Tagliapietra: Maestro of a Glass Renaissance through June 18th. The show features 30 pieces hand-picked by Morris Museum curator Alexandra Willis and Jim Schantz, director of Schantz Galleries.

For the first few months, it was a back and forth between Jim, Alex, and Alan in the beginning, choosing the work from our inventory, deciding which pieces to exhibit, and how to best utilize the space, pedestals, vitrines, and lighting.  After the work was chosen and finalized, Kim Saul, Director of Publications at Schantz Galleries, worked on the catalog.

View online catalog.

The exhibition chronicles the past 17 years of Lino Tagliapietra’s career. It includes a survey of his classical Venetian forms and canework, plus a range of examples of his experimental works. Pieces like those in his Dinosaur series meld sculpture with painting, as color and form accentuate and heighten the aesthetic response.

Russell Johnson

Dinosaur, 2015, 21.5 x 13 x 4.5″

Dinosaur is a seminal work of Lino’s that has become an icon in his repertoire; it’s become a signature form which he goes back to from time to time, while exploring new approaches of essentially ‘drawing’ or ‘painting’ with the glass cane material.

Lina Tagliapietra, Alan Levitan, Lino Tagliapietra, Melanie Levitan and Jacopo Vecchiato, Managing Director for Lino… as well as grandson!

Despite his worldwide acclaim and extensive exhibition record, the Morristown display represents the first solo museum show of Tagliapietra’s work in the New York, New Jersey metropolitan area. This has been a great opportunity for both Lino and the Morris Museum to present this work to both seasoned aficionados and those art enthusiasts new to the medium of glass. In both his life and work, Tagliapietra represents a living bridge between hundreds of years of Venetian glassmaking traditions and the experimental improvisations characteristic of the contemporary glass art movement.

Russell Johnson

Clodia, 2016, 28 x 12 x 6″

Although Lino embodies centuries of Venetian traditions in glassmaking techniques, he also continually quests to bring new ideas and approaches to the medium. He’s been greatly responsible for the incredible growth in the field of contemporary glass as an art form throughout the past 40 years.

Stelle di Neve, 2015, fused glass panel, 18.75 x 18.75 x 1.5″ Previously exhibited at Bergstrom Mahler Museum of Glass.

The exhibit spotlights Tagliapietra’s work from the 21st century. Since reaching “retirement age,” Tagliapietra has embarked upon a particularly productive period in his career, consolidating and advancing innovations and breakthroughs from earlier times. When curating this exhibition, it was important to focus on works that Lino has created since age 65. During this period he has not only created some of the greatest classical works, but some of the most innovative of his vast career.

Barene, 2012, 48.25 x 27.75 x .75″

The Morris Museum will host a number of special events in conjunction with “Maestro of a Glass Renaissance,” including “The Magic of Glass Through Time,” a historical perspective by Patricia Elaine of the Morris County School of Glass on Wednesday, April 19; a lecture titled “From Murano to Seattle: Lino Tagliapietra’s Journey” by GLASS Magazine Editor, Andrew Page on Sunday, April 23; a “Ladies Night Out” on Wednesday, April 26; and a tour through the exhibition conducted by Jim Schantz on Wednesday, May 17.  Details and ticketing for these and other events are available at the museum’s website.

Tagliapietra and Schantz led a preview tour at the exhibition.

For more information on these or any works in the exhibition, please contact Jim at Schantz Galleries. jim@schantzgalleries.com

Chiocciola, 2008, 16.25 x 18.75 x 7.5″

 

Chihuly Gifts Artwork at Tacoma’s Union Station

 

Chandelier and the Monarch Window at Union Station

Now more than ever, we feel compelled to find and celebrate the good in order to stay hopeful. We are very excited to share the news with you that in late January 2017, Dale and Leslie Chihuly gifted artwork at Union Station (Tacoma, Washington) to the United States. Mayor Strickland and the representatives from the GSA and the Tacoma Art Council recognized Dale and Leslie with a certificate of appreciation, and thanked them for making this amazing body of work accessible to everyone. Dale dedicated the work in memory of his father George, his mother Viola, and his brother George.

Click play for a preview and/or click the link to watch the full video Chihuly at Union Station.

It’s so great that Leslie and I could donate these installations to the GSA so people will forever go into that beautiful restoration and see my artwork there and the beautiful views of Mount Rainier… – Dale Chihuly

Thank you, Dale and Leslie, for your generosity and inspiration.

Click here to watch the full video on Chihuly’s Vimeo page.

To see more of Chihuly’s work, click here.







If you do not see the work you are looking for within this grouping, please let us know and we will locate the right piece for your collection.

Please fill in the information regarding the particular work you are interested in. Sometimes, we have problems with these forms, so if you do not hear back from us within 24 hours, please contact us directly at: contact@schantzgalleries.com or call the gallery at 413-298-3044.
Thank you for your interest!

Name

Email

Artist Name/ Title

Subject

Your Message