LINO

 “Cosa vuol dire amare il vetro?” (What does it mean to love glass?)  For Lino, to love glass is also to love life.

STOCKBRIDGE, MA: Schantz Galleries proudly presents an exhibition of works by Maestro Lino Tagliapietra, whose spirit of adventure, risk and learning drives him to push the medium of glass and test the seemingly boundless limits of his skill. His intricate work in filigrana, murrini, reticello, zanfirico, incalmo, and aventurine prove him to be a master of glass techniques and a creator of transcendent art experiences.

Lino with Medusa, 2006,  at Schantz Galleries.

Glass is deeply ingrained in Lino Tagliapietra; his astonishing body of work both chronicles his life and transcend his personal journey. They are artful illuminations of the myriad elements that make all our lives so full. From the tangible—things like colors, places, and animals, to the intangible—ideas like balance, strength, fragility, passion, whimsy, and freedom. Lino has said that “an exhibition is a long process made of life experiences.… Every object represents something I would like to be, like a tree that has many roots. It is crucial to recognize Lino—the tree—in each object.” Like the roots of a tree, the works by Lino in this exhibition unfurl in many directions, all the while retaining the quintessential qualities of their creator.

Lino with Florencia, 2018.  Click to view additional works currently on exhibition.

Recent works include the Florencia series, symbolizing the energy and exuberance of the Florentine culture. Few artists possess Lino’s skill at translating the essence of a place into a piece of glass. Fiery flames lick up the sides of Etna. Africa’s organic color palette adorns a basket-like vase. Urban sprawl and a mountainous backdrop form the minimalist decoration of Tapiei, and the magnificent peak of Fuji emerges from rings of evocatively colored glass.

Lino brings this characteristic expressiveness to his interpretation of animals. The curved ellipse of the belly of the Oca (Goose) supports the bird’s trumpeting neck. The humble Chiocciola (Snail) adorns a delicately balanced ovoid of clear glass. Boisterous patterns cover the powerful Fenice works, whose necks pull into long and impossibly curved forms.

When Lino Tagliapietra thinks about the meaning of his work, he must invariable think about the meaning of his life. He asks himself: Cosa vuol dire amare il vetro? (What does it mean to love glass?) For Lino, to love glass is also to love life. It means to embrace the harmonious elements of life that are so uniquely reflected in glass. It means to communicate this reverence and spread joy through beautiful works of art.

Lino and Lina looking into Celtica, 2018.

 

View the catalog online!

STANKARD RELEASES OUTSTANDING NEW BOOK—STUDIO CRAFT as CAREER

We are honored to represent and know Paul Stankard, and looking forward to three new pieces by him this arriving at the gallery this week! Until then, we are announcing his newest book, sure to be collected by artists and art collectors alike.

Paul Stankard, internationally renowned glass artist, recently published his third book, Studio Craft as Career, A Guide To Achieving Excellence In Art Making.  Stankard crafted this verbal artistry with two distinct purposes in mind.  The first half of this superb resource offers readers a special insight into Stankard’s career, his personal journey that led him to find his niche and allowed him to grow and reach his full potential as an artist.  In the second half, Stankard presents biographical career information and advice from a broad cross section of well-respected artists, who, along with Stankard, are important to the contemporary American craft landscape.  The outstanding photography selected by the author, serves to enhance and enrich the words of experience and wisdom offered by the author.

Stankard wrote this book to be a provocative text filled with harsh realities and dreams that fill the life and work of an artist.  The book was conceived to share personal experiences and offer direction for career growth.  Stankard thoroughly enjoys teaching and sharing his craft in his role as the Artist in Residence and Lecturer at Salem Community College.  He inspires students to search for their individual creative spirits and reach their full potential in life.  This book reflects Stankard’s passion for teaching.

Stankard is also the author of No Green Berries of Leaves:  The Creative Journey of an Artist in Glass; and, Spark the Creative Flame:  Making the Journey from Craft to Art, both highly acclaimed by the academic and literary communities.

Paul Stankard

Paul Stankard, Meditation in Herman Melville’s Garden, 2016 Lampwork encased in 4″ orb

About Paul Stankard           

Paul Stankard’s work is represented in more than 60 museums worldwide.  A pioneer in the studio-glass movement, Stankard is known for interpreting native flowers in small scale glass sculptures.  His work explores and interprets color, texture and delicacy while continuing to examine and celebrate the fecundity of the plant kingdom. He is a Fellow of the Corning Museum of Glass, Fellow of the American Craft Council, and received the coveted Urban Glass Award – Innovation In Glassworking Technique. Stankard has been recognized with Masters of the Medium honor by the James Renwick Alliance affiliated with the Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institute, Washington D.C. and was also awarded the Glass Art Society’s Lifetime Achievement Award.  Stankard and his wife Pat live in Mantua, New Jersey.

Cast and Carved Glass Process by Alex Gabriel Bernstein

“I feel as if I am an explorer. With each piece I make I prepare for a journey, I have a general idea where I want to go, but I never know where the path will lead me. Each piece I work on I set out in the hopes of discovering something new and exciting. As any explorer my journeys are filed with ups and downs, disappointments and breakthroughs, however with each piece I am sure to gain knowledge and insight which is the excitement that brings me to my studio every day.”

Alex Bernstein in his studio.

Alex Bernstein in his studio.

Using a diamond saw and grinding tools, Alex Gabriel Bernstein captures light and grace in his cut glass sculptures.  Alex grew up in a creative environment with access to many of the artists of the American studio glass movement. As the child of two established glass artists, William and Katherine Bernstein, the beautiful surroundings of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Western North Carolina where they lived played almost as much of a part in his inspired upbringing as did the breadth of teachers around him.

Alex studied psychology at the University of North Carolina in Asheville and worked at a children’s psychiatric hospital before making the decision to pursue his artistic endeavors full time. He received a Master of Fine Arts from the Rochester Institute of Technology’s School for American Crafts and went on to teach at the Rochester Institute of Technology, the Cleveland Institute of Art, the Penland School of Crafts, and The Studio at the Corning Museum of Glass. Most recently Alex was the Department Head of Glass at the Worcester Center for Crafts in Massachusetts but he made the decision to return to his hometown, Asheville, NC, in 2007 to set up a studio and focus on creating his own work full-time.

The following images show Alex’s general process from start to finish in creating a unique, cast and carved glass sculpture.

1_Alex Gabriel Bernstein Glass

Alex puts small chunks of glass go into a very basic steel mold. This mold happens to be half of an old fire extinguisher.

2_Alex Gabriel Bernstein Glass

Next is firing the glass in the kiln. At 1550 degrees, all the small pieces of glass homogenize into one glass block. These blocks are then slowly cooled down to room temperature which can take least a week – up to a month for larger pieces. This process is called Annealing.

3_Alex Gabriel Bernstein Glass

Alex draws his design on the glass .

4_Alex Gabriel Bernstein Glass

A large diamond saw is used to cut the glass.

5_Alex Gabriel Bernstein Glass

… and refined with grinding tools.

6_Alex Gabriel Bernstein Glass

Here is the over all shape.  You can see some of the grinding tools as well.

7_Alex Gabriel Bernstein Glass

Very carefully, Alex adds cuts with the diamond saw, which gives his work it’s unique appearance.

9_Alex Gabriel Bernstein Glass

Here, the base is measured and drawn to be cut and fit to the larger part of the sculpture

The completed sculpture.

The completed sculpture.