MONTGOMERY MUSEUM of FINE ART | Lino Tagliapietra Exhibition

“Tagliapietra’s creativity and techniques have had a profound impact on generations of glass artists and on the medium itself. We are honored to have artwork from one of his most important series, Dinosaur, in our permanent collection. Many are in awe after seeing the beautiful elongated shape of the sculpture for the first time, and we are thrilled to have the opportunity to present a larger body of Tagliapietra’s work to the region.”  Angie Dodson, Director of the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts.

Jim Schantz, Jennifer Jankauskas. Lino, Kim Saul, Charles and Winnie Stakely.

We are very honored to be able to participate in curating this solo exhibition of Lino Tagliapietra, Master of Beauty.  This is the first time an exhibition of Tagliapietra’s extraordinary sculptures have been on view in the state of Alabama. The project began several years ago when our friends and clients, Charles and Winnie Stakely suggested having an exhibition of Lino Tagliapietra’s work at the Montgomery Museum of Fine Art. We have known the Stakely’s for many years and they certainly are very familiar with Lino’s work and we are thankful for their lead sponsorship of this exhibition. We are also grateful to our new friends, Laura and Barrie Harmon, and Dawn and Adam Schloss for their sponsorship and the AACG for a grant they provided.

Lino explaining his technique to the Collectors Tour participants.

We would like to thank Ed Bridges, Jennifer Jankauskas, Margaret Lynn Ausfeld and Sarah Kelly, and the many people on the staff at the museum for all their time and effort in arranging this exhibition. We would also like to thank James Bill and Kristen Johnson, from our staff back in Stockbridge and Jacopo Vecchiato, Lino’s grandson, who is Director of Lino’s U.S. operation.

It was my pleasure to be able to curate the 40 works in this exhibition to represent a cross-section of Lino’s work. With a career spanning more than 70 years, it would be challenging to exhibit the range works that represent his incredible career. The works in this exhibition span the past twenty years.

Below, photography by Becca Beers, provided by the MMFA.

                                   

The entire staff and board members of the museum planned a wonderful two days filled with dinners, talks, and a festive opening reception. We were treated to that warm Southern hospitality and charmed by each and every person we met there.  Lino Tagliapietra and Jim Schantz spoke at a lecture before a member-only opening for the show.  The Montgomery Museum of Fine Art is absolutely amazing, with regional and national collections of very important works, outdoor sculpture garden, the most creative and engaging educational art facility we have ever seen…. and the nearby Shakespeare Theater across the reflecting pond is state of the art. This museum is certainly a destination for the people of the region to learn from and too enjoy.

Lino with Ed Bridges.

Adam and Dawn Schloss with Lino.

The exhibition, Lino Tagliapietra, Master of Beauty runs through January 20, 2019. 

LINO TAGLIAPIETRA | SOFA 2018

This year is the 25th year for SOFA Chicago and we are proud to say that Jim Schantz has been there for 23 of those years! Unbelievable!!

 

Lino Tagliapietra has stated that SOFA Chicago is the most important show to present his newest creation, and he works towards that goal. When in the windy city, he enjoys meeting his fans, seeing long time friends, and the fine dining in Chicago. 

 

 

 

For the 25th Anniversary of SOFA, Lino has created the Secret Garden, a wall installation featuring leaf forms that are blown and hot sculpted.  Additionally he has taken his Florencia Series further… 

 

We hope to see you there and share these and other exciting works by the Maestro with you. Here is a catalog of a selection of works to be presented – be sure you view full screen to get the full effect.

2018 Schantz Galleries Seattle Tour photo album

These photos are taken by Roger Meyers. There were over 1600 images for us to choose from, and for those, he had to edit his images down from about 3000!  SO, this is a thank you to him and to all the other participants who journeyed on that 5-day tour and had the best time ever looking at glass, meeting the artists, touring around Seattle and dining on excellent food.

  

Walking into a hot shop is exhilarating, and even if you have done it before, that sense of wonder never lessens, believe us, as we have been going on these trips to Seattle for over 15 years, and some of our collectors have opted to go back with us 2 or 3 times…. It’s that good!

Below is a link to our online blog where many more photos are posted.

Enjoy!  Jim and Kim

 On this five-day Seattle Glass Collectors Tour, … Read More and see the photo album!

 

LINO

 “Cosa vuol dire amare il vetro?” (What does it mean to love glass?)  For Lino, to love glass is also to love life.

STOCKBRIDGE, MA: Schantz Galleries proudly presents an exhibition of works by Maestro Lino Tagliapietra, whose spirit of adventure, risk and learning drives him to push the medium of glass and test the seemingly boundless limits of his skill. His intricate work in filigrana, murrini, reticello, zanfirico, incalmo, and aventurine prove him to be a master of glass techniques and a creator of transcendent art experiences.

Lino with Medusa, 2006,  at Schantz Galleries.

Glass is deeply ingrained in Lino Tagliapietra; his astonishing body of work both chronicles his life and transcend his personal journey. They are artful illuminations of the myriad elements that make all our lives so full. From the tangible—things like colors, places, and animals, to the intangible—ideas like balance, strength, fragility, passion, whimsy, and freedom. Lino has said that “an exhibition is a long process made of life experiences.… Every object represents something I would like to be, like a tree that has many roots. It is crucial to recognize Lino—the tree—in each object.” Like the roots of a tree, the works by Lino in this exhibition unfurl in many directions, all the while retaining the quintessential qualities of their creator.

Lino with Florencia, 2018.  Click to view additional works currently on exhibition.

Recent works include the Florencia series, symbolizing the energy and exuberance of the Florentine culture. Few artists possess Lino’s skill at translating the essence of a place into a piece of glass. Fiery flames lick up the sides of Etna. Africa’s organic color palette adorns a basket-like vase. Urban sprawl and a mountainous backdrop form the minimalist decoration of Tapiei, and the magnificent peak of Fuji emerges from rings of evocatively colored glass.

Lino brings this characteristic expressiveness to his interpretation of animals. The curved ellipse of the belly of the Oca (Goose) supports the bird’s trumpeting neck. The humble Chiocciola (Snail) adorns a delicately balanced ovoid of clear glass. Boisterous patterns cover the powerful Fenice works, whose necks pull into long and impossibly curved forms.

When Lino Tagliapietra thinks about the meaning of his work, he must invariable think about the meaning of his life. He asks himself: Cosa vuol dire amare il vetro? (What does it mean to love glass?) For Lino, to love glass is also to love life. It means to embrace the harmonious elements of life that are so uniquely reflected in glass. It means to communicate this reverence and spread joy through beautiful works of art.

Lino and Lina looking into Celtica, 2018.

 

View the catalog online!

2018 ART PALM BEACH

 

Exhibiting 25 new works at Art Palm Beach this January 14-21. Meet the Maestro!

Also, Pilchuck Director, Jim Baker will present a Tribute to Lino during the Speaker Series.  Prosecco Reception to follow at Schantz Galleries booth #308.

Contact the gallery for a VIP pass or a catalog… while they last!

Master of Beauty | Lino Tagliapietra

To behold Lino Tagliapietra’s glass art is to perceive pure beauty, inspired by the magnificence of the artist’s surroundings, travels, and experiences. In his 1753 volume Analysis of Beauty, English painter and writer William Hogarth (1697-1764) laid out the six principles that affect our perception of beauty: fitness (fitting parts of a whole elegantly together); variety (blending shapes and colors harmoniously); uniformity (balancing symmetry with shifting perspectives); simplicity (discarding superfluous elements); intricacy (leading the eye with thoughtful composition); and quantity (inspiring awe through grandness). Hogarth’s ground-breaking tome also described the serpentine “line of beauty,” an s-shaped curve used in art that awakens the viewer and is pleasing to behold. Flawlessly orchestrating all six of Hogarth’s tenets and deftly employing the “line of beauty,” each work by Tagliapietra beguiles the viewer, transporting them to a place of unadulterated grace.

The Fenice series epitomizes the lively allure of the curving line. Impossibly elongated pulls of glass twist dynamically through the air. Hot reds give way to fiery oranges, which cool to deep blues, manifesting the myriad colors of flame as the glass phoenix rises. The interplay of curves in the installation of three Fenice works reveals myriad expressions as the viewer moves around the piece. Equally in the Dinosaur works, a sense of infinity defies their physical boundaries. The magnificence of the extinct beasts are expressed, softened through graceful bends in their necks and modernized through the graphic patterns of the glass. A repetition of circles plays delightfully against the kaleidoscopic swathes of color that surround the surfaces.

The graceful arcing forms of the Forcola works are also enhanced by undulating layers of design. Concentric circles—in some cases from a single color family, in others from complimentary hues—stretch like taffy to reveal the exquisite patterns inlaid in the glass. So named because their shape artfully recalls the rowlocks of Venetian gondolas, the Forcola works—like so many by Tagliapietra—expressively celebrate a place of affection for the artist.

Geography has had a considerable influence on the artist, who has traveled the world extensively to work and teach; each location leaves its mark on his soul and in his work. Recalling woven African baskets in form and pattern, the globular Africa vase sits nimbly on a narrow foot and revels in a vibrant, jewel-like palette. Rippled “lines of beauty” wind their way up the vase in both directions, culminating in a vivid blue lip of gently waving canes. The rolling swells of a sand dune are captured in the intricate Sahara, its amber coloring punctuated by an azure oasis. Like the blue sea that gives way to the volcano for which they are named, the Stromboli works erupt with cascading cerulean lava, punctuated by frenetic green swirls and daubs of crimson.

Just as Tagliapietra brings a unique perspective to the places he visits by rendering them abstractly in glass, so he brings his forward-looking ideology to artistic traditions. A long-lost glass making technique using avventurine glass is reborn in Tagliapietra’s hands. In a triumph of alchemy, suspended metal in the glass infuses the material with shimmering luster. Hogarth wrote that “simplicity gives beauty even to variety.” In the Avventurine works, minimal and classical shapes are brilliantly juxtaposed with a mosaic of swirling, sparkling designs.

Whether by the 18th century standards of a thinker like Hogarth, or by modern codes, Lino Tagliapietria is a master of beauty. To combine centuries-old traditions with contemporary explorations of the medium, to pay homage to the intimate places he knows and the faraway worlds he has visited, and to do so with such an inherent understanding of what makes things beautiful—this is a true gift. Tagliapietra’s sumptuously articulated forms and dazzling designs are masterfully balanced yet playful. A “line of beauty” unfurls in front of our eyes in each work and in the body of work as a whole. 

lino in new england 2017

“When is Lino coming back?” This is a question we hear throughout the year, not only from glass artists and our loyal art collectors, but also from our friends in town, especially at the coffeeshop, where Lino loves to chat with the local townspeople and tourists. He is interested in everything and everyone, and a keen observer of human nature. Lino loves New England and America’s history. Between working and teaching at the MIT Glass Lab, his exhibitions at our gallery and throughout New England and teaching at Haystack in Maine, Lino has traveled extensively throughout the region and has a keen interest in American culture and history.

What do so many people love about the art of Lino Tagliapietra? The artist!

Lino has never stopped being curious about life, art and culture and continues to share his knowledge with others. We see in Lino‘s art not only the highest level of skill and mastery of material, but a personal quest for new discoveries. Lino continues to challenge himself by finding the next exciting or sublime form, striving for new forms of expression and creativity. Lino’s work has a presence which references yet transcends time.

Each piece that Lino makes is so special and unique because he is so passionate about life and his work. Each aspect is so important and genuine. This is what makes Lino’s work stand out. We believe when one walks into Lino’s exhibition this summer, they will see completely new forms and approaches to his medium. There are also some incredible unique examples of Lino’s classic forms within this collection.

We are so fortunate in our lifetime to witness a maestro and artist in one, who through his openness to life and humanity can transform silica into miraculous works of art… and that he travels the world and visits us in Stockbridge!

We hope you can also stop by the gallery and view some of the newest works as well as many classic, iconic sculptures by Lino Tagliapietra.

Catalog Online

 

Curating an Exhibition at the Morris Museum

“Although Lino embodies centuries of Venetian traditions in glass-making techniques, he also continually quests to bring new ideas and approaches to the medium”  –Jim Schantz, director of Schantz Galleries in Stockbridge, Massachusetts.

“The boldness of his vision is why he’s so widely celebrated, married with that technical virtuosity. It’s this combination of tradition and innovation that really sets Lino apart from pretty much anybody else working in glass.”   Andrew Page, managing editor of GLASS Quarterly

It began over a year ago with a conversation between a gallerist and a collector; Jim Schantz and Alan Levitan.   Alan asked after learning that Jim had curated the show at the Bergstrom Mahler Museum of Glass, “How about a show of Lino’s work at the Morris Museum?”

“Of course!” Jim said, “… and we can help with it!”

After hundreds of hours and many phone calls, meetings, committees, detailed lists of arrangements,  The Morris Museum currently showcases a selection of the maestro’s works in the exhibition, Lino Tagliapietra: Maestro of a Glass Renaissance through June 18th. The show features 30 pieces hand-picked by Morris Museum curator Alexandra Willis and Jim Schantz, director of Schantz Galleries.

For the first few months, it was a back and forth between Jim, Alex, and Alan in the beginning, choosing the work from our inventory, deciding which pieces to exhibit, and how to best utilize the space, pedestals, vitrines, and lighting.  After the work was chosen and finalized, Kim Saul, Director of Publications at Schantz Galleries, worked on the catalog.

View online catalog.

The exhibition chronicles the past 17 years of Lino Tagliapietra’s career. It includes a survey of his classical Venetian forms and canework, plus a range of examples of his experimental works. Pieces like those in his Dinosaur series meld sculpture with painting, as color and form accentuate and heighten the aesthetic response.

Russell Johnson

Dinosaur, 2015, 21.5 x 13 x 4.5″

Dinosaur is a seminal work of Lino’s that has become an icon in his repertoire; it’s become a signature form which he goes back to from time to time, while exploring new approaches of essentially ‘drawing’ or ‘painting’ with the glass cane material.

Lina Tagliapietra, Alan Levitan, Lino Tagliapietra, Melanie Levitan and Jacopo Vecchiato, Managing Director for Lino… as well as grandson!

Despite his worldwide acclaim and extensive exhibition record, the Morristown display represents the first solo museum show of Tagliapietra’s work in the New York, New Jersey metropolitan area. This has been a great opportunity for both Lino and the Morris Museum to present this work to both seasoned aficionados and those art enthusiasts new to the medium of glass. In both his life and work, Tagliapietra represents a living bridge between hundreds of years of Venetian glassmaking traditions and the experimental improvisations characteristic of the contemporary glass art movement.

Russell Johnson

Clodia, 2016, 28 x 12 x 6″

Although Lino embodies centuries of Venetian traditions in glassmaking techniques, he also continually quests to bring new ideas and approaches to the medium. He’s been greatly responsible for the incredible growth in the field of contemporary glass as an art form throughout the past 40 years.

Stelle di Neve, 2015, fused glass panel, 18.75 x 18.75 x 1.5″ Previously exhibited at Bergstrom Mahler Museum of Glass.

The exhibit spotlights Tagliapietra’s work from the 21st century. Since reaching “retirement age,” Tagliapietra has embarked upon a particularly productive period in his career, consolidating and advancing innovations and breakthroughs from earlier times. When curating this exhibition, it was important to focus on works that Lino has created since age 65. During this period he has not only created some of the greatest classical works, but some of the most innovative of his vast career.

Barene, 2012, 48.25 x 27.75 x .75″

The Morris Museum will host a number of special events in conjunction with “Maestro of a Glass Renaissance,” including “The Magic of Glass Through Time,” a historical perspective by Patricia Elaine of the Morris County School of Glass on Wednesday, April 19; a lecture titled “From Murano to Seattle: Lino Tagliapietra’s Journey” by GLASS Magazine Editor, Andrew Page on Sunday, April 23; a “Ladies Night Out” on Wednesday, April 26; and a tour through the exhibition conducted by Jim Schantz on Wednesday, May 17.  Details and ticketing for these and other events are available at the museum’s website.

Tagliapietra and Schantz led a preview tour at the exhibition.

For more information on these or any works in the exhibition, please contact Jim at Schantz Galleries. jim@schantzgalleries.com

Chiocciola, 2008, 16.25 x 18.75 x 7.5″

 

Lino Tagliapietra | “Painting in Glass” at the Philadelphia Museum

Lino Tagliapietra‘s Painting in Glass, on display at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, now through July 16, 2017.

Giuditta, (detail) Fused glass panel, 2013. photo: Russell Johnson

Lino Tagliapietra is best known as one of the world’s preeminent glassblowers. He imbues each of his vessels with a rare elegance and intelligence. The contours of his Dinosaurs turn gracefully, his avventurine works dazzle, and each new series of Tagliapietra’s demands not only renewed contemplation of great beauty, but also renewed reflection on the locus of Lino’s work in terms of history, tradition, and inspiration.

Lino composing Giuditta in 2013 at Bullseye Glass in Portland Oregon. photo Jen Elek

A Maestro of Glass since age twenty-one, Lino Tagliapietra has kept us admiring and thinking with every twist of the blowpipe for over sixty years. Recently, however, the artist surprised us in a new way, diverging from blown glass to explore a new method within his dedicated medium. As always, Tagliapietra reveals both his mastery of and ability to seamlessly reinvent traditional techniques, employing murrini and cane in the creation of works that read as glass paintings, or more properly, constitute kiln-fused glass panels.

Porta con Finestra, (Door with a Window), inspired by the colorful houses on the island of Burano. photo: Russell Johnson

Lino Tagliapietra’s panels have garnered many comparisons to paintings by artists like Rothko, Klimt, and Van Gogh, placing Tagliapietra’s work in conversation with that of Western Civilization’s greatest painters. Though a Modernist aesthetic presents itself throughout the body of Lino’s work, perhaps his Modernism is most easily sensed in what could be considered one of the glass artist’s most experimental, or unconventional, series.

Lino at work on the Chicago panel in Portland Oregon. photo: Jen Elek

His panels represent risk, a new way of seeing, unyielding exploration, and an unquenchable vitality that pushes past fear and apprehension. As Lino said of his panels, “it’s a big effort with myself to go and explore in this direction. It feels a bit scary to go to the gallery with work like this. But it’s a huge opportunity…”

Chicago, 2015, 31.5 x 39.5 x .75″

We are grateful and humbled to be able to watch as the Maestro transcends conventions and limitations. Lino Tagliapietra inspires with his work, but also with his immense talent, unparalleled dedication, and relentless search to experience and share that next new sense of wonder.

Many thanks to the curators, Andrew Page and Elisabeth Agro.  Andrew Page is the editor-in-chief of GLASS: The UrbanGlass Art Quarterly, who works with art critics, museum curators, and practicing artists to put the most important work being done in glass into a critical context. Elisabeth Agro has served as Associate Curator of American Modern and Contemporary Crafts and Decorative Arts at the Philadelphia Museum of Art since June 2006.  Thank you also to sponsors of the show, including The Leonard and Norma Klorfine Foundation Endowed Fund for Modern and Contemporary Craft, the Center for American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Be sure to visit Schantz Galleries in Stockbridge to see an exceptional variety of fused glass panels by Lino Tagliapietra.

Elizabeth Agro, Lino Tagliapietra and Norma Klorfine at the opening event at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

 

Lina Tagliapietra and Anna Ferro with “Field of Flowers.”

 

Visitors with Lino Tagliapietra, at the opening reception viewing “Genesis, Evolution.”

LINO TAGLIAPIETRA | INSPIRATIONS

Current Exhibition

 

Lino Tagliapietra continues to share his experience as a technically masterful glass blower, teacher and artist who travels the world in search of inspiration for his work. This thirst for discovery mirrors one of his favorite explorers, Corto Maltese, a character from an early graphic novel by Italian comic book artist Hugo Pratt (1927-1995), who was venerated for fantastical stories and graphic dexterity.  An interesting sidebar is that Lino’s wife, (Lina Ongaro), of over 56 years had and uncle who also was an artist who worked alongside Pratt when he was in Venice. Through the artwork and stories, Lino found a simpatico spirit and fellow adventurer in the tales of Corto’s travels as told through Pratt’s art.

Fórcole, 2016 38¾ x 11 x 8″; 38½ x 14 x 8″; 37 x 11 x 8″                                                                                   photo: Kim Saul

This year at SOFA Chicago, Lino Tagliapietra will debut several new series—Cayuga, Contarini and Fórcole—all reminiscent of places or experiences visited or imagined by the artist; he also continues to explore both panel glass and the sumptuous and challenging avventurine with a five Dinosaur Installation. Lino is forever striving to find new inspirations, forms, and techniques as well as opportunities to make his work.

Gondolier in Venice, see the fórcole, on which the oar is resting.                                                       Adobe stock photo

 

Fórcole, which Tagliapietra designed specifically for this show, are named after the rowlocks found on the gondolas in the beautiful lagoons of his native Venice. In this body of work, he re-imagines the centuries-old tradition of making fórcole, metamorphosing a functional object into sculpture. With remarkable technical ability, he communicates his expressive aesthetic and his light, intelligent, and inspiring presence. The strength and beauty of the glass parallels the natural vitality of the young wood that becomes fórcole. As with traditional Venetian oarlocks, each of Tagliapietra’s Fórcole requires an impressive amount of time and labor. Much as the wood must first be carefully chosen, hewn, seasoned, carved, and then finished with sandpaper and a sealant, so the glass and colors must first be made, blown into a shape, cut from the vessel, carved with battuto, shaped through slumping in a kiln, and polished. The Maestro has stated that it will be some time before he creates additional Fórcole because the amount of work that goes into each piece is so staggering.

Cayuga, 2016 21½ x 14½ x 7½”                                                                                                                                    photo: Russell Johnson

Cayuga experiments with shape as the compressed sides diverge from Lino’s more trademark symmetry. Lino worked with this form in May of this year at the MIT hot shop in Cambridge, MA and was very excited about the shape of the vessel. The sensual piece in this exhibition was made a few months later, at the GAS conference in at the Corning Museum of Glass in Corning, NY, and named after the nearby Finger Lakes. When he travels to work in different hot shops around the world, Lino prefers to bring his own color which he has special recipes for, and one of his favorites is his own red.

Lino Tagliapietra, schantz galleries

Contarini, 2016 20 x 9¼ x 6″                                                                                                                                     photo: Russell Johnson

Another new series is the Contarini, first blown May 2016 at the MIT hot shop in Cambridge, MA. Lino’s Contarini— colorful, multilayered vessels with clear murrini and swirling, vertical composition—are defined by wildly mod graphics. They are so named because they reminded Lino of the windows the Palazzo Contarini, in Venice.

Palazzo Contarini in Venice.                                                                                       Adobe stock photo

The Contarini family is a noted Venetian family, from which eight Doges led the Venetian Republic forward through ever changing ages between 1043 and 1797. The famous architect, Andrea Palladio, who was employed by the Contarini and their relatives, designed several of the most outstanding neo-classical structures in the Veneto’s environs.

Lino Tagliapietra

Dinosaur Installation, 2016,  29½ x 45¾ x 5″                                                                                                                                                             photo: Russell Johnson

A true adventurer with the material, another series in Tagliapietra’s recent body of work revitalizes a centuries-old glass-making technique called avventurine (from the Italian for adventure), which began in 17th-century Murano when a member of the Miotti family accidentally dropped some copper filings into a glass batch. The delicate process of incorporating metal into liquid glass then cooling it in low oxygen, reducing atmosphere as the mineral deposits clump gingerly together is capricious and often results in failure. Just to prepare the material is a feat of alchemy. When it works, shimmering striations of crystallized metal suspend wondrously in the glass. As Tagliapietra has described it “…sometimes I feel that it is not glass … but I feel the absolute magic and the preciousness of a material that came from the past.” The serpentine Fenice and the elegant Oca reveal how colors can vary from silver to gold, copper red to blue, purple to green depending on the filtering effects of the colored glass comprising the body of the material, and how the suspended metal deposits can be pulled into assorted shapes.

In Greek and Roman mythology, the Muses were a source of knowledge and the inspirational goddesses of the arts—music, sculpture, poetry and dance. Glass artist Lino Tagliapietra finds his muses all around him. Whether traveling to upstate New York or an island in the South Pacific, glimpsing a water bird stretching her neck to the sky or the reflection of colors in his lagoon, Lino discovers new ideas wherever he finds himself. He is completely open to the experiences of life and perpetually looking forward to the next inspiration.

It is rare that the maestro is without his camera, ready to capture the next encounter along his travels and to remind himself later of the colors and spirit of a person, place or time.                                                                                  photo: Jim Schantz