2018 Schantz Galleries Seattle Tour photo album

These photos are taken by Roger Meyers. There were over 1600 images for us to choose from, and for those, he had to edit his images down from about 3000!  SO, this is a thank you to him and to all the other participants who journeyed on that 5-day tour and had the best time ever looking at glass, meeting the artists, touring around Seattle and dining on excellent food.

  

Walking into a hot shop is exhilarating, and even if you have done it before, that sense of wonder never lessens, believe us, as we have been going on these trips to Seattle for over 15 years, and some of our collectors have opted to go back with us 2 or 3 times…. It’s that good!

Below is a link to our online blog where many more photos are posted.

Enjoy!  Jim and Kim

 On this five-day Seattle Glass Collectors Tour, … Read More and see the photo album!

 

Preston Singletary Baskets

“The technical combination of blown and sand carved glass demonstrates a firm control of the material. Creating the surface of Tlingit Basket forms is a time intensive process. Using masking material cut to the width of straw or grass, each layer is sandblasted and then remasked until the carved effect is achieved. In all of his sculptures the patterns and designs tell stories not for our minds to consider, but also for our hands as the work is so tactile.”  Jim Schantz, Carving the Past into the Future, 2011

 

The beauty of the Tlingit Baskets by Preston Singletary is only equal to the amazement for the intricacy of the  process to achieve them, therefore, we are posting a brief description for a better appreciation!

Objects in this series are titled “Tlingit Basket” and the correct medium is “blown and sand-carved glass.” They are created in either the smaller “Berry” size or the larger “Shelf” size. 

The baskets that Preston Singletary creates are contemporary glass versions of traditional Tlingit baskets, which were woven from spruce tree roots.  Tlingit designs found on historical baskets inspire the designs on these glass baskets. Singletary began making this series around 2004.

Tlingit Basket Process

The process for making the glass baskets is complex – it involves first blowing the glass form with two layers of glass (for example: a cream color over red) and wrapping a bead of hot glass around the lip.  

When the basket has cooled, a stencil is applied to the surface, to create the larger basket designs, and then strips of custom-made tape are applied over the stencil, first vertically, then horizontally in a spiral in order to create the basket weave design.

 

The whole surface is deeply sandblasted (called sand-carving) once, then the spiral of tape is removed, then it is sandblasted a second time, and finally the vertical lines of tape are removed.  Everything that is covered with the stencil is not exposed to the sandblasting process. After the last sand blasting, the entire stencil is removed to reveal the textured basket design. Finally, it is given a light sandblasting (called frosting) and coated with a special finish called Liquid Luster, to protect the now porous glass and give it its characteristic low sheen.

 

    

We hope you can visit us in Stockbridge to see more of Preston Singletary baskets as well as his many other creations. 

Classical, Native and Pop Culture in Glass

3 friends at Schantz 2016 header narrow

Karl Marx wrote in 1845 that “only in community with others has each individual the means of cultivating his gifts in all directions.” The interconnectedness of Richard Marquis, Dante Marioni, and Preston Singletary, cultivated throughout the years, has not created a vacuum of homogeneity in glass. Rather, as these three distinct artists demonstrate, the community of glass has given each individual the “means of cultivating his gift in all directions.”

Richard Marquis, Whole Elk Tower with Manikins, 2015

Richard Marquis, Whole Elk Tower with Manikins, 2015.  Blown glass,murrine whole elk technique,found objects, 17.5 x 19 x 13″

 Schantz Galleries is pleased to present an exhibition of works by three contemporary artists working in glass.  Having worked together on and off over the past 30 years, and maintained a friendship, the three men are each masters of their techniques and have developed extremely different thematic concerns over the years.  Each in their own time has studied and then taught their specialized techniques.

Setter Head Bottle Vehicle Richard Marquis 2016 Glass: hot slab construction, cast glass, wood, brass 7 x 18 x 7"

Richard Marquis, Setter Head Bottle Vehicle, 2016.  Glass: hot slab construction, cast glass, wood, and brass. 7 x 18 x 7″

With over 50 years of experience and a sophisticated understanding of material, color, and form, Richard Marquis balances his training and scrupulous artistic integrity with the playfulness and capacious spirit of an upstart, full of original notions just waiting to burst out in creative action. Simultaneously ironic yet refined, silly yet smart, eclectic yet recognizable, Marquis is nothing if not totally, authentically himself. In part, Marquis’ style emerged from 1960s California funk (he got his B.A. and M.A. from U.C. Berkeley), a counter-movement to east coast Minimalism fusing, among other things, pop-culture, a cartoon aesthetic, and the use of found objects.

Marioni Leaf Vessel Grouping, 2016

Dante Marioni, Leaf Vessels, 2016.  Blown glass, greatest height is 42″

 

Dante Marioni ­grew up in the thick of the studio art glass movement and first met Marquis when he was 7. When Marioni got into glass as a teen, he felt disconnected with what he called the “loose and free-form” aesthetic that characterized the movement in the 1970s. He has said that “over the course of my career I have been consumed mostly with forms—that is, making interesting shapes. As a glass blower, I have always considered that to be my primary challenge.”

Preston Singletary, Supernatural Being, 2016, 13 x 12 x 12"

Preston Singletary, Supernatural Being, 2016.  13 x 12 x 12″

Preston Singletary uses glass a means of understanding, and sharing, his Tlingit heritage in the context of modern society. He explains that he compares “my current notion of society with that of my ancestors, intuiting ideas and concepts in glass, referencing my connection to my Tribe, my clan and my family. My influences range from Indigenous art around the world to the glass-blowing process, modernist sculpture, design and music.” Though he considered a career in music, he realized that glass-making gave him a purpose and a responsibility, to “interpret the codes and symbols of the land in a new way.”

Preston Singeltary

Preston Singletary, Tlingit Shelf Baskets, 2015. Blown and sand carved glass, greatest height is 8.75″

The unique cultures of the Pacific Northwest, both past and present, encourage friendship, a sharing of ideas, and cooperative efforts. This is certainly true of Richard Marquis, Dante Marioni, and Preston Singletary. From pop to classical to native, from murrini to cane to sandblasting, from witty to refined to narrative, Marquis, Marioni, and Singletary demonstrate the endless possibilities when the creative mind meets molten glass and fire.

PHOTOS: Richard Marquis, Manikins, 2016; Dante Marioni,  Leaf Vessels, 2016; Preston Singletary, Blue Tooth, 2016. photo credits: R.Marquis, K.Saul, Russell Johnson

 

IF YOU GO:

POP, CLASSICAL, and NATIVE CULTURES IN GLASS (THREE OLD FRIENDS): Richard Marquis, Dante Marioni, and Preston Singletary

Exhibition September 9 – October 4, 2016

Gallery Hours:  11 a.m.–5 p.m.

Schantz Galleries Contemporary Glass, 3 Elm Street, Stockbridge, Massachusetts 01262

Tel: 413-298-3044  www.schantzgalleries.com

For more information, email Kim Saul at kim@schantzgalleries.com